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Repository: https://github.com/mozilla-l10n/www.mozilla.org/tree/master/zh-TW/

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download.lang download_button.lang firefox/android/index.lang firefox/australis/firefox_tour.lang firefox/australis/fx36_tour.lang firefox/channel.lang firefox/choose.lang firefox/desktop/customize.lang firefox/desktop/fast.lang firefox/desktop/index.lang firefox/desktop/tips.lang firefox/desktop/trust.lang firefox/developer.lang firefox/dnt.lang firefox/family/index.lang firefox/geolocation.lang firefox/hello-2016.lang firefox/hello.lang firefox/includes/mwc_2015_schedule.lang firefox/installer-help.lang firefox/ios.lang firefox/new.lang firefox/nightly_firstrun.lang firefox/os/devices.lang firefox/os/faq.lang firefox/os/index-new.lang firefox/os/tv.lang firefox/privacy_tour/privacy_tour.lang firefox/private-browsing.lang firefox/sendto.lang firefox/sync.lang firefox/tracking-protection-tour.lang firefox/whatsnew_38.lang firefox/whatsnew_42.lang firefox/win10-welcome.lang foundation/annualreport/2011.lang foundation/annualreport/2011faq.lang foundation/annualreport/2012/faq.lang foundation/annualreport/2012/index.lang legal/index.lang lightbeam/lightbeam.lang main.lang mobile.lang mozorg/404.lang mozorg/about.lang mozorg/about/history-details.lang mozorg/about/history.lang mozorg/about/leadership.lang mozorg/about/manifesto.lang mozorg/contribute/index.lang mozorg/contribute/stories.lang mozorg/home/index.lang mozorg/mission.lang mozorg/plugincheck.lang mozorg/products.lang newsletter.lang privacy/index.lang privacy/principles.lang tabzilla/tabzilla.lang teach/smarton/index.lang thunderbird/features.lang thunderbird/index.lang thunderbird/start/release.lang

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teach/smarton/security.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • Get smart on cybersecurity
  • Look both ways, stay updated, and make sure your passwords are as buff as you are. Get smart on cybersecurity.
  • Cybersecurity
  • Do you check for a secure connection when browsing the Web? Do you know how to recognize one?
  • Are you doing as much to secure your online information as you do your personal property?
  • How many passwords do you use, and how long have you had them?
  • Cybersecurity explained
  • As intimidating as it may sound, cybersecurity is actually really simple: it just means protecting yourself and your information online.
  • You can’t prevent every threat out there – online or off.
  • But you can definitely minimize your risk with some awareness and common sense.
  • This PBS’ Nova Labs video offers great background on cybersecurity.
  • The Three Watch-Outs
  • Visit our cybersecurity glossary on <a href="{url}">Shape of the Web</a> to nerd out on security terms and techniques.
  • of Internet users are concerned about someone hacking into their online accounts and stealing personal information like photos and private messages.
  • (CIGI IPSOS, November 2014)
  • Protecting yourself starts with knowing what to look out for. Here’s a quick rundown of the three most common cybersecurity threats:
  • Manipulation
  • Malicious hackers use all kinds of tricks to access and exploit your personal information.
  • Like phishing (e.g. a fake bank email asking for your personal information), spamming, hacked accounts and the classic “Nigerian Prince” email (also called a “419 scam”).
  • Healthy skepticism is your best friend on this front.
  • Test your phishing knowledge
  • Malware
  • Viruses, worms, Trojan horses… These nasty little programs are designed to infect your machine to cause damage, steal personal information, spy or force ads on you.
  • Avoiding malware means being smart about where you click.
  • Websites and networks are vulnerable to attacks from the simple to the very sophisticated.
  • This threat is the hardest to prevent. But you can put a few more barriers between yourself and the attackers.
  • Build your safety net
  • Improve your security online with these safety measures recommended by Mozilla policy pros.
  • Look both ways
  • The first and most important thing is just to pay close attention to where and when you click.
  • Trust your gut
  • If a link or download doesn’t feel quite right, it probably isn’t.
  • Make sure you install programs only from verified trusted sources, and don’t click on anything that looks even remotely suspicious – even when you think you know the source.
  • Watch yourself in public
  • When you navigate the Web on a public Wi-Fi network, anyone who chooses to snoop can see some or all of your activity.
  • So avoid sensitive activities when surfing in public.
  • And before you share any kind of info anywhere online, think about how it might make you vulnerable.
  • Lock your doors
  • Strong password practices are your single best protection against almost every kind of threat on the Web.
  • Choose strong PINs and passwords
  • Here are some Mozilla <a href="{url}">tips for creating a strong password for every device and account</a>.
  • And get in the habit of changing your passwords once a year.
  • Don’t use a single password everywhere
  • Would you use the same key for your front door, your car, and your safety deposit box? Probably not.
  • <a href="{url}">Keep track with a password manager</a> instead.
  • Do the two-step
  • For the best protection, take advantage of 2-step authentication wherever it’s offered.
  • Find out more.
  • In case of emergency
  • Here’s what to do <a href="{url}">if you think your account has been compromised</a>.
  • Fix it before it breaks
  • Software updates are like oil changes ­– they can be a hassle in the moment, but a lifesaver in hindsight.
  • Update apps and devices regularly to take advantage of developers’ latest and greatest security enhancements.
  • Firefox plugin check
  • Chrome plugin check
  • Internet Explorer plugin check
  • Safari plugin check
  • Install a security system
  • Now that you’ve handled the basics, set the alarm.
  • These programs prevent and protect against cyber surprises.
  • It won’t protect against everything, but it’s a good start.
  • Here are two free options:
  • Firefox Add-ons
  • These add-ons will help you identify what you’re clicking before you click:
  • <a href="{url}">Long URL please</a> — replaces most shortened URLs with the originals so you know the destination
  • <a href="{url}">URL Tooltip</a> — displays the destination of a link when hovering over it
  • Blast your cybersecurity smarts
  • The more we talk, share tips and stay alert about cybersecurity, the safer we all are.
  • Keep the conversation going with your community on social media, at home — maybe even on that public Wi-Fi at the airport.
  • Are you a teacher? Give your students a <a href="{url}">simple lesson in cybersecurity</a>.
  • How many online passwords do you have?
  • What kind of security tips and tricks do you use online?
  • On a scale from 1 to 10, how safe do you feel online? Is it always clear to you whether or not your activities are secure?
  • On a scale from 1 to 10, how safe do you feel online?

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

teach/smarton/surveillance.lang

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Original English source file
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Strings identical to English:

  • Get smart on government surveillance
  • Decide where you think the line should be – and keep others from crossing it. Get smart on government surveillance.
  • Ask yourself
  • If you’re not under investigation, should the government be able to:
  • monitor your phone calls?
  • read your emails and view the photos I send?
  • see what you search for on the Web?
  • Government surveillance explained
  • Stakeouts have always been an essential tool for law enforcement and national security.
  • The difference now is that they’ve moved beyond binoculars, bugs and bad guys: surveillance has gone digital.
  • All that data we generate through our daily activities online allows governments to keep an eye on lots of people at once, in hopes of catching the ones who are up to no good.
  • It’s like grabbing a giant haystack just in case there might be a needle inside.
  • Stored info is vulnerable info
  • In order to tailor personal experiences for you, virtually every technology company you interact with collects and stores some amount of your personal information.
  • Under certain circumstances, those companies can be forced to <a href="{url}">turn over your information to governments</a>.
  • So what should companies do?
  • They can be proactive about protecting users’ information by limiting data collection to what’s needed, making data anonymous where possible, and deleting data when it’s no longer necessary.
  • This is what we practice at Mozilla.
  • The solution: Safeguards
  • When surveillance is too broad or lacks key safeguards – like getting a warrant from a judge – it can be abused, either accidentally or on purpose. And our personal privacy is what’s at stake.
  • In order to protect our personal liberties and maintain our trust in the Internet, Mozilla’s policy team proposes that government surveillance must follow three fundamental principles:
  • Minimal impact
  • Efforts should be made to collect only the information that’s needed, without compromising Internet infrastructure, technology companies’ data systems, or users’ trust.
  • Accountability
  • Governments should be held accountable.
  • This means being transparent and specific about information collection, and answering to independent oversight and to the public.
  • User security
  • Strong encryption and security keep us safe from many kinds of criminals.
  • Governments shouldn’t weaken the security of all in the name of spying on a few.
  • “Some amount of surveillance for law enforcement and intelligence, properly designed, is valuable to keep us safe. But when it’s too broad, it violates the privacy rights of millions of innocent people, and can even undermine our security.”
  • — Chris Riley, Head of Public Policy, Mozilla
  • of Internet users are concerned with the police or other government agencies from their country secretly monitoring their online activities
  • (CIGI IPSOS, November 2014)
  • Act before you react
  • We all have the right to live a full online life without fear of surveillance. Rather than give up your freedom, take back your control.
  • Take a stand
  • The first thing we can all do is keep our eyes and ears out – and make our voices heard.
  • Get informed
  • Start with a simple online search to learn about your government’s stance on surveillance, so you can make informed decisions about your privacy.
  • Stay updated
  • Sign up for the <a href="{url}">Mozilla newsletter</a> (English only).
  • We actively track issues of mass surveillance and other threats to the Web, so we’ll let you know about opportunities to speak out.
  • Close your blinds
  • These quick steps can help protect you from overreaching surveillance practices.
  • Browse carefully
  • Always look for the padlock in your browser’s address bar.
  • Cap your camera
  • Put a sticker in front of your webcam when you’re not using it.
  • Watch the Wi-Fi
  • Be careful when using a public Wi-Fi network.
  • Find out more.
  • Change your locks
  • Passwords are an essential tool for shielding information from prying eyes.
  • Choose strong PINs and passwords.
  • Here are some Mozilla <a href="{url}">tips for creating a strong password for every device and account</a>.
  • And get in the habit of changing your passwords once a year.
  • Don’t use a single password everywhere.
  • Would you use the same key for your front door, your car, and your safety deposit box? Probably not.
  • Keep track with a password manager instead.
  • See instructions for <a href="{firefox}">Firefox</a>, <a href="{chrome}">Chrome</a>, <a href="{ie}">Internet Explorer</a>, <a href="{safari}">Safari</a> and <a href="{opera}">Opera</a>.
  • Do the two-step
  • For the best protection, take advantage of 2-step authentication wherever it’s offered.
  • Try encryption
  • Encryption is a bit like scrambling a frequency: it turns information into codes that can only be read if you have the right keys.
  • No software provides perfect protection from spying, but Mozilla programmers recommend these easy encryption tools to take your online security beyond basic.
  • Phone apps
  • These apps use encryption to secure your phone calls, texts, picture and video communications.
  • Device encryption
  • Use these on your devices to make sure the only eyes that see your personal information are the ones you authorize.
  • <a href="{url}">FileVault</a> — a free and built-in way to encrypt your Mac’s startup disk
  • Use <a href="{url1}">BitLocker</a> (Windows Pro) or a free program called <a href="{url2}">Diskcryptor</a> (standard Windows versions).
  • Full-disk encryption is usually offered when you set up your system (it’s called LUKS).
  • <a href="{url}">See instructions here</a> for your Android device.
  • Have an iPhone, iPad or iPod? <a href="{url}">See instructions here</a>.
  • Blast your surveillance smarts
  • Now that you have tools to help protect yourself, spread the word to friends.
  • The only way we’ll get a handle on this fundamental issue of technology is if we keep the conversation going.
  • Which would you be more comfortable sharing with the government: your checking account number or your DNA profile?
  • If you had a digital lockbox that no one could see but you, what would you put in it?
  • Have you stopped sharing certain things online since you found out about mass government surveillance?
  • Are you a teacher? Give your students a <a href="{url}">simple lesson on government surveillance</a>.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

teach/smarton/tracking.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
83 10 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • Get smart on tracking
  • What you do online is your business, and you can keep it that way. Get smart on tracking.
  • Ask yourself
  • Do you feel in control of your personal information online?
  • Do you know what a cookie is (no, not the delicious kind)?
  • Have you ever wondered why some content, like ads, seems to follow you around?
  • Every time we go online, we leave behind traces of our activity. They’re often called our “digital footprints” and for good reason, because tracking is sort of like re-tracing our steps.
  • But our digital footprints reveal more about us than where we’ve been — everything from our preferences to our identities.
  • Watch the documentary at donottrack-doc.com.
  • To get a good look at how tracking works, be sure to check out the first episode of Brett Gaylor’s documentary series, <a href="{url}"><cite>Do Not Track</cite></a>.
  • Tracking in action
  • Let’s imagine a typical day online: you start by checking emails, maybe share a fun article you just read.
  • At lunch, you check showtimes for a movie a friend recommended on Facebook and look up prices for some new camping gear you’ve had your eye on.
  • That’s only a few sites, but what’s happening behind the scenes is that many more “third-parties” — companies that are separate from the sites you’re visiting — are seeing and recording your activity.
  • So when you begin seeing recommended articles about that movie, or ads for that camping gear, later in the day, it’s no coincidence.
  • Tracking for personalization
  • What are cookies?
  • Cookies are small data files that websites and third parties place on your computer to remember your preferences or to track your activity, sometimes across multiple sites.
  • of adults say they are “not too confident” or “not at all confident” that records of their activity maintained by the online advertisers who place ads on the websites they visit will remain private and secure.
  • The websites we visit will often collect data about us to better personalize our experiences with them.
  • The information they gather through analytics can be used to make navigating their site easier for us or to present us more relevant offers.
  • They also use cookies — small data files placed in our browsers — to remember language preferences or the contents in a shopping cart.
  • By the way…
  • Mozilla sites are no exception. Like most other Web sites, we also use third party tools to improve user experience.
  • For more info see our <a href="{url}">Website Privacy Notice</a>.
  • Tracking without permission
  • Many websites we visit contain hidden third parties — such as data brokers, affiliate networks and advertising networks — who use cookies, and other data tracking methods, to collect information about our browsing habits without our consent.
  • While tracking can be helpful, there can’t be a healthy trade-off between the value it provides and the data it collects without transparency.
  • Going beyond the Web
  • Online tracking is just one part of a larger ecosystem of data collection.
  • Within this ecosystem, anonymized online data can be merged with personally identifiable information about you (information that you may have volunteered on a form, in an app or that was collected offline) to build a surprisingly detailed profile of you.
  • These profiles have the potential to interfere with your life offline, and can contribute to unfair practices by being improperly used for price discrimination, decreased creditworthiness, more expensive insurance coverage or unfavorable employment or health reports.
  • While these instances are not widespread yet, they do illustrate the potential depths of what is happening behind the scenes and outside of our control.
  • Be the boss of your personal info
  • There are many ways you can take back and maintain control of your online activity.
  • Here are some important tips, hand-picked by Mozilla experts.
  • A lot goes on behind the scenes of the Internet. The more you know, the better you can decide what your information is worth to you.
  • Understand the hidden cost of free
  • We all like the appeal of “free” apps and online services but if you’re not paying for them, someone is, and what they’re buying may be the data you leave behind.
  • Decide whether the information you share is worth the service you are receiving.
  • If you’re a Firefox user, be sure to check out <a href="{url}">Lightbeam</a>, a simple and insightful add-on that visually graphs the depth of your browsing activity, including parts that are not usually visible to you.
  • Think before you click
  • When you see an element on a page, such as a “like” or social media login button, that’s an indication that some information has already been collected about you — clicking on it will share even more.
  • Choose choice
  • It’s easy to overlook the access to personal data that we might offer through online accounts and apps, but most offer settings that give you choice and control.
  • Delete your unused accounts
  • Your data might get sold when a service or app shuts down.
  • If you don’t use it, close it.
  • Protect your profiles
  • Some services you interact directly with let you control the information they have about you.
  • Look at any opportunity to change or control your profile, if offered.
  • For example, you can manage your profile and preferences for <a href="%(google)s">Google</a>, <a href="%(yahoo)s">Yahoo!</a> and <a href="%(facebook)s">Facebook ads</a>, and even <a href="%(acxiom)s">edit data that’s been collected about you by Acxiom</a>, one of the world’s largest marketing data brokers.
  • Some mobile apps you install can access a lot of information about you, including details not necessarily related to the service they provide.
  • Control your privacy and location settings on <a href="{ios}">iOS</a> and <a href="{android}">Android</a>.
  • Look to your browser
  • Most Web browsers offer a set of privacy features designed to give you control.
  • Here are a few key ones that you can make use of.
  • Did you know?
  • Firefox is filled with features designed to give you even more control over your personal information.
  • Private Browsing with Tracking Protection
  • This feature minimizes the ability of hidden third parties to track your browsing activity across many sites.
  • This toolbar option <a href="{url}">removes browsing information from your computer after the fact</a>. Use it when you’ve visited a site that you don’t want in your history.
  • The Mozilla privacy team has put together <a href="{url}">a collection of Firefox add-ons</a> to help you manage your privacy online.
  • With this feature enabled, your browser will tell social sharing services, publishers, analytics providers, advertisers and third party networks that you want to opt-out of tracking.
  • Mozilla was the first company to include a Do Not Track feature when it was added to Firefox in 2011.
  • Since then, it has been adopted by most major browsers, though many companies on the receiving end of the requests are still not honoring them.
  • Efforts are being made by Web advocacy groups to have this changed.
  • Learn how to enable Do Not Track in <a href="%(firefox)s">Firefox</a>, <a href="%(chrome)s">Chrome</a>, <a href="%(ie)s">Internet Explorer</a>/<a href="%(edge)s">Edge</a> and <a href="%(safari)s">Safari</a>.
  • Private Browsing
  • Use Private Browsing to keep from having certain items about your browsing activity locally saved.
  • These include your history, searches and cookies.
  • Desktop
  • Smartphone
  • Firefox for Android
  • Additional privacy settings
  • Many browsers offer a range of privacy settings that will help you stay in control. Explore them here:
  • Share your tracking smarts
  • Now that you have some tools and the knowledge to protect yourself, spread the word to friends.
  • The more everybody knows about tracking and how to protect their online data, the better off we’ll all be. Feel free to use the questions below to keep the conversation going!
  • Are you a teacher? Give your students <a href="{url}">a simple lesson on tracking</a>.
  • What privacy settings do you use in your browser?
  • How much are you willing to share about yourself in exchange for personalized content?
  • Have you ever used private browsing?

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

contribute-autorepliesraw

Repository: https://github.com/mozilla-l10n/www.mozilla.org/tree/master/zh-TW/

DONE

activism.txt coding_addons.txt coding_cloud.txt coding_firefox.txt coding_firefoxos.txt coding_marketplace.txt coding_webcompat.txt coding_webdev.txt dontknow.txt education_webmaker.txt l10n_product.txt l10n_tools.txt l10n_web.txt qa_addons.txt qa_general.txt qa_marketplace.txt qa_webcompat.txt sumo_sumo.txt sumo_webcompat.txt writing_addons.txt writing_marketplace.txt writing_txt_devs.txt writing_txt_users.txt

Note: for 'raw' files – like text files – we can only rely on update dates. Warnings or errors for optional files are not displayed.

Filename Status Reference file Locale file
education_fellowships.txt untranslated Reference file 2014-10-09 19:27 Locale file 2014-09-22 20:34
education_hive.txt untranslated Reference file 2014-10-09 19:27 Locale file 2014-09-22 20:34
education_sciencelab.txt untranslated Reference file 2014-10-09 19:27 Locale file 2014-09-22 20:34
writing_journalism.txt untranslated Reference file 2014-10-09 19:27 Locale file 2014-10-10 15:46
writing_social.txt untranslated Reference file 2014-10-09 19:27 Locale file 2014-09-22 20:34