Web Dashboard

Lang format file checker cs

www.mozilla.orglang

Repository: https://github.com/mozilla-l10n/www.mozilla.org/tree/master/cs/

DONE

download_button.lang firefox/accounts-2018.lang firefox/all.lang firefox/campaign.lang firefox/channel/index.lang firefox/facebookcontainer/index.lang firefox/features/bookmarks.lang firefox/features/fast.lang firefox/features/independent.lang firefox/features/index.lang firefox/features/memory.lang firefox/features/password-manager.lang firefox/features/private-browsing.lang firefox/features/send-tabs.lang firefox/features/sync.lang firefox/hub/home-quantum.lang firefox/installer-help.lang firefox/mobile.lang firefox/new/quantum.lang firefox/nightly_firstrun.lang firefox/nightly_whatsnew.lang firefox/products/developer-quantum.lang firefox/profile-per-install.lang firefox/sendto.lang firefox/shared.lang firefox/switch.lang firefox/tracking-protection-tour.lang firefox/whatsnew.lang firefox/whatsnew_61.lang firefox/whatsnew_63.lang firefox/whatsnew_66.lang firefox/whatsnew_67.lang foundation/advocacy.lang foundation/annualreport/2011.lang foundation/annualreport/2011faq.lang foundation/index.lang foundation/issues.lang foundation/leadership-network.lang legal/index.lang main.lang mozorg/404.lang mozorg/500.lang mozorg/about-2019.lang mozorg/about/history-details.lang mozorg/about/history.lang mozorg/about/manifesto.lang mozorg/contribute/index.lang mozorg/contribute/signup.lang mozorg/contribute/stories.lang mozorg/home/index-quantum.lang mozorg/internet-health/decentralization.lang mozorg/internet-health/digital-inclusion.lang mozorg/internet-health/index.lang mozorg/internet-health/open-innovation.lang mozorg/internet-health/privacy-security.lang mozorg/internet-health/shared.lang mozorg/internet-health/web-literacy.lang mozorg/mission.lang mozorg/plugincheck-update.lang mozorg/products.lang mozorg/technology.lang navigation.lang newsletter.lang privacy/faq.lang privacy/index.lang privacy/principles.lang

TODO

firefox/accounts-2019.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
32 0 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • There is a way to protect your privacy. Join Firefox.
  • Get a Firefox Account – Keep your data private, safe and synced
  • Take your stand against an industry that’s selling your data to third parties. Stay smart and safe online with technology that fights for you.
  • Securely sync your passwords, bookmarks and tabs across all your devices. Get a Firefox Account now – One login – Power and privacy everywhere.
  • There is a way to protect your privacy. <span>Join Firefox.</span>
  • Take your stand against an industry that’s making you the product.
  • Join Firefox
  • Enter your email address to get started.
  • Already have an account?
  • Sign In
  • You’re signed <br>in to Firefox. <br><span>Now try Firefox Monitor.</span>
  • See if you’ve been involved in an online data breach.
  • Sign In to Monitor
  • Firefox is technology that fights for you.
  • Get technology that fights for you.
  • Firefox <span>browser</span>
  • Travel the internet with protection, on every device.
  • Keep your passwords protected and portable.
  • Get a lookout for data breaches.
  • Share large files without prying eyes.
  • Get it all on every device, without feeling trapped in a single operating system.
  • And get it all on every device, without feeling trapped in a single operating system.
  • Get the respect you deserve.
  • You’ll always get the truth from us. Everything we make and do honors our <a href="%(promise)s">Personal Data Promise</a>:
  • Take less.<br> Keep it safe.<br> No secrets.
  • Get the knowledge to keep you safe.
  • Learn everything you need to know (but don’t yet) about staying smart and safe online, from some of the world’s foremost experts.
  • And be part of protecting the internet for future generations.
  • Help us build a better Firefox for all.
  • Get into the open source spirit by test-driving upcoming products.
  • Help us keep Big Tech in check.
  • We support communities all over the world standing up for a healthier internet. Add your voice to the fight.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/adblocker.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
32 0 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • How to block annoying ads using an ad blocker
  • How to stop seeing too many ads and keep companies from following you around online. An ad blocker guide from the Firefox web browser.
  • The ad blocker – a secret weapon against annoying ads.
  • So many ads, so little patience… It’s time to stop the madness.
  • The average person sees an average of 4,000 ads a day. If you think that’s too many, an ad blocker is your new best friend.
  • An ad blocker is a piece of software that can be used to block ads, and they work in two ways. The first way is when an ad blocker blocks the signal from an advertiser’s server, so the ad never shows up on your page. Another way ad blockers work is by blocking out sections of a website that could be ads.
  • These ads might be loud video ads, ads that follow you around the web, trackers, third-party cookies, and more. To use an ad blocker, you can search for ad blocker add-ons that are available in your browser. <a href="%(firefox)s">Firefox</a>, for example, has <a href="%(addons)s">this list of approved ad blocker add-ons</a>. Click on this list (or ad blockers that are approved for your browser) and see which fits your needs.
  • Find the right ad blocker for you
  • There’s <a href="%(url)s">AdBlocker Ultimate</a> that gets rid of every single ad, but buyer beware. Some of your favorite newspapers and magazines rely on advertising. Too many people blocking their ads could put them out of business.
  • Popup ads are the worst. Block them with <a href="%(url)s">Popup Blocker</a> and never deal with another annoying popup again.
  • One of the most popular ad blockers for Chrome, Safari and Firefox is <a href="%(url)s">AdBlock</a>. Use it to block ads on Facebook, YouTube and Hulu.
  • Create a tracker-free zone with Content Blocking
  • On Firefox, you can use <a href="%(privacy)s">Privacy</a> or <a href="%(blocking)s">Content Blocking</a> settings to get even more control over ad trackers that serve you the ads.
  • Choose your level of protection
  • To start, click on the Firefox menu in the top right-hand corner of your screen. It looks like three lines stacked on top of each other. In the drop-down menu, click on Content Blocking. You should see a blue pop-up with different selections.
  • Go easy with Standard mode
  • If ads don’t bother you and you don’t mind being followed by trackers and third-party cookies, then the Standard setting should work for you. To get trackers off your tail in Standard mode, use a <a href="%(url)s">Private Browsing</a> window.
  • Get tough with Strict mode
  • If seeing too many ads ruins your day, then the Strict mode is a better fit. This mode will block known third-party trackers and cookies in all Firefox windows.
  • Do-it-yourself Custom mode
  • The Custom setting gives you the ultimate choice. You can decide what you’re blocking, including trackers, cookies and more. If you allow cookies from a website, you’ll automatically be in Custom mode.
  • Cover your trail, block trackers
  • Click on the Trackers box and you’ll be able to block trackers in two ways. One way to block trackers is to do it when you’re working in a Private Window. Another way to do it is to block trackers in all windows. Keep in mind that if you choose to always block trackers, some pages might not load correctly.
  • Take a bite out of cookies
  • <a href="%(url)s">Cookies</a> are sent by websites you visit. They live on your computer and monitor what you’ve been doing on a site. When an airline hikes your rates because you’ve looked at plane tickets once that day, that is the handiwork of a cookie.
  • In Firefox, you can block all third-party cookies or just those set by trackers. Be aware that blocking all cookies can break some sites.
  • Send a Do Not Track signal
  • If you don’t want your online behavior used for ads, you can send websites a polite “thanks but no thanks” letter by checking the <a href="%(url)s">Do Not Track</a> option of Firefox. Participation is voluntary, but the websites that participate will stop tracking you immediately.
  • Speed up thanks to ad blockers
  • In some cases, an ad blocker can help your browser go faster. When an ad is loading, it can slow down a website. At the same time, it takes longer to find what you’re looking for if you’re too busy closing yet another ad.
  • If you want to learn more about ad blocking, there are hundreds of ad blocker extensions available for Firefox and other browsers. If want to try out the ad blockers Firefox uses, <a href="%(url)s">click here to download</a> a browser that puts privacy first.
  • Take control of your browser.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/all-unified.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
34 0 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • Download the Firefox Browser in English (US) and more than 90 other languages
  • Everyone deserves access to the internet — your language should never be a barrier. That’s why — with the help of dedicated volunteers around the world — we make the Firefox Browser available in more than 90 languages.
  • Choose which Firefox Browser to download in your language
  • Check the system requirements
  • Release notes
  • Source code
  • Firefox Privacy Notice
  • Need help?
  • Which browser would you like to download?
  • Learn about Firefox browsers
  • Get help
  • You are about to download:
  • Browser:
  • Platform:
  • Language:
  • Sorry, we couldn’t find the download you’re looking for. Please try again, or select a download from the list below.
  • Download Now
  • Menu
  • The standard Firefox browser — fast and private. If you’re not sure which Firefox to choose, choose this.
  • Get a sneak peek at the latest Firefox browser features before they’re released.
  • Test your sites against soon-to-be-released Firefox browser features with powerful, flexible DevTools that are on by default.
  • The pre-alpha version for power users who like to hunt crashes and test new features as they’re coded.
  • Count on stability and ease of use with this Firefox browser built for enterprise.
  • 64-bit installers
  • Choose a 64-bit installer for computers with 64-bit processors, which allow them to allocate more RAM to individual programs — particularly important for games and other demanding applications.
  • 32-bit installers
  • Choose a 32-bit installer for computers with 32-bit processors — or for older or less powerful computers. <a href="%(url)s">If you aren’t sure</a> whether to choose a 64-bit or 32-bit installer, we recommend you go with 32-bit.
  • MSI installers
  • Windows installers for corporate IT that simplify the configuration, deployment and management of the Firefox Browser.
  • Which version would you like?
  • Select your preferred installer
  • Learn about installers
  • Select your preferred language
  • Download %(product_label)s for %(platform)s in %(locale)s

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/best-browser.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
28 0 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • Find your best browser for speed, privacy and security.
  • So many browser options, but there’s only one that works best for your needs. The best browser for you should offer both speed and privacy protection.
  • Privacy, speed, and security.
  • How to choose the best browser for you.
  • The internet has become as essential as electricity and running water, so choosing the best browser for you is more important than ever. The internet is a second office, a teacher and sometimes a medical advisor, even if your actual doctor would prefer you didn’t look up your symptoms online.
  • In the mid-nineties, Netscape, Internet Explorer and AOL dominated the landscape. It was a simpler time when the sweet melody of dial-up internet rang across the land. You learned the meaning of patience waiting for web pages to load. Back then, all that mattered was browser speed.
  • Today is a different story. Ads, privacy hacks, security breaches, and fake news might have you looking at other qualities in a browser. How does the browser protect your privacy? Does it allow trackers to follow you across the web? Does it built to multitask and handle many computer and internet operations at once?
  • When you use a browser for everything, it needs to be fast. But for the same reason, it needs to be private. A browser has access to everything you do online, so it can put you at real risk if it doesn’t have strong privacy features.
  • Marshall Erwin, Senior Director of Trust and Security at Mozilla
  • If you’re wondering what it means to have a private or fast browser, here’s a breakdown of three things a browser should have.
  • A browser built for speed.
  • A browser is still a tool, so it makes sense that you’ll want to pick the best one for the job. If you’re a human who needs to work to survive, you’ll need a fast internet browser. One thing to keep in mind is a browser that runs third-party trackers is more likely to be slower than a browser that doesn’t. Third-party trackers are cookies, and while you can’t see them, they are running in the background of the site, taking up precious time. The more third-party trackers a browser blocks, the faster it can run.
  • This is one of the many reasons to choose the Firefox browser: Firefox blocks third-party trackers by default. We have other reasons and we’ll get into those later.
  • A browser that puts safety first.
  • Remember the last massive data breach? If not, it’s probably because it happens so often. Companies hold on to customer data, like their personal or financial information, and hackers steal it. If you’re making safety a priority, then a secure internet browser is the best browser for you.
  • There are a few ways a browser can help its users stay secure. A browser that is up to date with the latest security tech can help protect your computer and websites from unwanted visitors, such as malware or computer viruses.
  • The second is not storing too much user data. Hackers can’t steal what’s not there, which is why Firefox keeps a minimum amount of information about its users. <a href="%(data)s">Firefox knows</a> if you use the browser and your general location <a href="%(privacy)s">but not the name of your childhood pet or your favorite color.</a>
  • Last but not least, a safe browser should offer tools to help you keep an eye on your accounts. Think of alerts that go straight to your email if any of your accounts get breached or icons that tell you whether a website is encrypted, (i.e., if it’s a good idea to enter your credit number on a shopping site).
  • Firefox is offering something new to keep you safe: <a href="%(monitor)s">Firefox Monitor</a>. It’s a free service that will alert you if there are any public hacks on your accounts and let you know if your accounts got hacked in the past. Another neat feature is the Green Lock. It looks like a small green icon at the top left side of the browser window. If you’re on Firefox and see the green lock, it means the website is encrypted and secure. If the lock is grey, you might want to think twice about entering any sensitive information.
  • We visit hundreds or even thousands of websites each day, and you can’t expect users to make security and privacy decisions for each of these sites. That is why a browser that gives you more control is so important - because it offers real, meaningful protection.
  • A browser that minds its business.
  • Privacy on the web is a hot button issue. If privacy is number one on your list of priorities, you want to look for a browser that takes that seriously. When choosing the best private browser for you, look at the tracking policy and how a browser handles your data. These seem like technical questions, but they’re the reason some browsers are more private than others.
  • Trackers are all those annoying “cookies” messages you get on airline sites. These third-party trackers know where you click and can be used to analyze your behavior. A private browser should give users the option to turn off third-party trackers, but ideally, turn them off by default.
  • Another way to stop trackers from tracking is using private mode to browse. Any browser that claims to be private should offer browsing in private mode.
  • One easy way to check is to visit a browser’s content setting page and privacy policy. The privacy webpage should outline if your data is shared and why. It’s why the <a href="%(privacy)s">Firefox privacy notice</a> is easy to read and easy to find.
  • Choosing the best browser for you is a lot like choosing a home. You want to explore your options, do some research and make a decision based on what’s important to you.
  • At <a href="%(firefox)s">Firefox</a>, we’ve worked hard to build a browser that is twice as fast as before and gives users more control over their online life.
  • Take control of your browser.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/campaign-trailhead.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
14 0 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • Download Firefox
  • Free Web Browser
  • Download Mozilla Firefox, a free web browser. Firefox is created by a global non-profit dedicated to putting individuals in control online. Get Firefox for Windows, macOS, Linux, Android and iOS today!
  • Download the fastest Firefox ever
  • Faster page loading, less memory usage and packed with features, the new Firefox is here.
  • Get the latest Firefox browser.
  • And start getting the respect you deserve with our family of privacy-first products.
  • Download Now
  • Join Firefox
  • Connect to a whole family of respectful products, plus all the knowledge you need to protect yourself online.
  • Passwords made portable
  • <strong>Firefox Lockwise</strong> makes the passwords you save in Firefox available on all your devices.
  • Protect your privacy
  • <strong>Private Browsing</strong> clears your history to keep it secret from anyone who uses your computer.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/new/trailhead.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
11 23 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • Connect to a whole family of respectful products, plus all the knowledge you need to protect yourself online.
  • <strong>Firefox Lockwise</strong> makes the passwords you save in Firefox available on all your devices.
  • <strong>Private Browsing</strong> clears your history to keep it secret from anyone who uses your computer.
  • You’ve already got the browser. Now get even more from Firefox.
  • Watch for hackers with Firefox Monitor, protect passwords with Firefox Lockwise, and more.
  • Get More From Firefox
  • Just Download The Browser
  • It’s <strong>privacy and peace of mind</strong> on mobile, too.
  • It’s a <strong>family of products</strong> that treat your personal data with respect.
  • It’s everything you need to know about <strong>staying safe online</strong>.
  • It’s <strong>a community</strong> that believes tech can do better.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/browser-history.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
23 2 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • Browser History: Epic power struggles that brought us modern browsers
  • The browser wars, underdogs vs giants, and moments that changed the world. Read about the history of the web browser.
  • The History of Web Browsers
  • World history is rife with epic power struggles, world-conquering tyrants, and heroic underdogs. The history of web browsers isn’t very different. University pioneers wrote simple software that sparked an information revolution, and battle for browser superiority and internet users.
  • Before Web Era
  • In 1950, computers took up whole rooms and were dumber than today’s pocket calculators. But progress was swift, and by 1960 they were able to run complex programs. Governments and universities across the globe thought it would be great if the machines could talk, nurturing collaboration and scientific breakthroughs.
  • <a href="%(arpanet)s">ARPANET</a> was the first successful networking project and in 1969 the first message was sent from the computer science lab at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) to Stanford Research Institute (SRI), also in California.
  • That sparked a revolution in computer networking. New networks formed, connecting universities and research centers across the globe. But for the next 20 years, the internet wasn’t accessible to the public. It was restricted to university and government researchers, students, and private corporations. There were dozens of programs that could trade information over telephone lines, but none of them were easy to use. The real open internet, and the first web browser, wasn’t created until 1990.
  • Web Era
  • British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee created the first web server and graphical web browser in 1990 while <a href="%(cern)s">working at CERN</a>, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in Switzerland. He called his new window into the internet “WorldWideWeb.” It was an easy-to-use graphical interface created for the NeXT computer. For the first time, text documents were linked together over a public network—the web as we know it.
  • A year later, Berners-Lee asked CERN math student Nicola Pellow to write the Line Mode Browser, a program for basic computer terminals.
  • By 1993, the web exploded. Universities, governments, and private corporations all saw opportunity in the open internet. Everyone needed new computer programs to access it. That year, Mosaic was created at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign by computer scientist Marc Andreessen. It was the very first popular web browser and the early ancestor of <a href="%(firefox)s">Mozilla Firefox</a>.
  • NSCA Mosaic ran on Windows computers, was easy to use, and gave anyone with a PC access to early web pages, chat rooms, and image libraries. The next year (1994), Andreessen founded <a href="%(netscape)s">Netscape</a> and released Netscape Navigator to the public. It was wildly successful, and the first browser for the people. It was also the first move in a new kind of war for internet users.
  • The Browser Wars
  • By 1995, Netscape Navigator wasn’t the only way to get online. Computer software giant Microsoft licensed the old Mosaic code and built its own window to the web, <a href="%(ie)s">Internet Explorer</a>. The release sparked a war. Netscape and Microsoft worked feverishly to make new versions of their programs, each attempting to outdo the other with faster, better products.
  • Netscape created and released JavaScript, which gave websites powerful computing capabilities they never had before. (They also made the infamous <a href="%(blink)s">&lt;blink&gt; tag</a>.) Microsoft countered with Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), which became the standard for web page design.
  • Things got a little out of hand in 1997 when Microsoft released Internet Explorer 4.0. The team built a giant letter “e” and snuck it on the lawn of Netscape headquarters. The Netscape team promptly knocked the giant “e” over and <a href="%(dino)s">put their own Mozilla dinosaur mascot on top of it</a>.
  • Then Microsoft began shipping Internet Explorer with their Windows operating system. Within 4 years, it had 75%% of the market and by 1999 it had 99%% of the market. The company faced antitrust litigation over the move, and Netscape decided to open source its codebase and created the not-for-profit <a href="%(mozilla)s">Mozilla</a>, which went on to create and release Firefox in 2002. Realizing that having a browser monopoly wasn’t in the best interests of users and the open web, Firefox was created to provide choice for web users. By 2010, Mozilla Firefox and others had <a href="%(marketshare)s">reduced Internet Explorer’s market share to 50%%</a>.
  • Other competitors emerged during the late ‘90s and early 2000s, including Opera, Safari, and Google Chrome. Microsoft Edge replaced Internet Explorer with the release of Windows 10 in 2015.
  • Browsing the Web Today
  • Today there are just a handful of ways to access the internet. Firefox, Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Safari and Opera are the main competitors. Mobile devices have emerged during the past decade as the preferred way to access the internet. Today, most internet users only use mobile browsers and <a href="%(applications)s">applications</a> to get online. Mobile versions of the major browsers are available for iOS and Android devices. While these apps are very useful for specific purposes, they only provide limited access to the web.
  • In the future, the web will likely stray further from its hypertext roots to become a vast sea of interactive experiences. Virtual reality has been on the horizon for decades (at least since the release of Lawnmower Man in 1992 and the Nintendo Virtual Boy in 1995), but the web may finally bring it to the masses. Firefox now has support for <a href="%(vr)s">WebVR and A-Frame</a>, which let developers quickly and easily build virtual reality websites. Most modern mobile devices support <a href="%(vr)s">WebVR</a>, and can easily be used as headsets with simple cardboard cases. A 3D virtual reality web like the one imagined by science fiction author Neal Stephenson may be just around the corner. If that’s the case, the web browser itself may completely disappear and become a true window into another world.
  • Whatever the future of the web holds, Mozilla and Firefox will be there for users, ensuring that they have powerful tools to experience the web and all it has to offer. The web is for everyone, and everyone should have control of their online experience. That’s why we give Firefox tools to protect user privacy and we never sell user data to advertisers.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/newsletters.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
7 168 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • Keep up with our annual compilation of research and stories on the issues of privacy &amp; security, openness, digital inclusion, decentralization, and web literacy.
  • Get all the knowledge you need to stay safer and smarter online.
  • Not all subscriptions are supported in all the languages listed. Almost all are offered in English, German and French.
  • Text subscribers will receive an email twice a year to confirm continuation of the subscription. Those emails may include HTML.
  • Many of our communications are related to an account you’ve signed up for, such as Firefox Accounts, MDN Web Docs, or Add-on Developer. To manage one of your accounts or see a list of all the accounts visit our <a href="%s">account management support page</a>.
  • To get access to the whole world of Firefox products, knowledge and services in one account, join us! Learn more about the benefits <a href="%s">here</a>.
  • There are many ways to engage with Mozilla and Firefox. If you didn’t find what you were looking for here, check out our <a href="%s">community pages</a>.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/what-is-a-browser.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
20 1 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • What is a web browser?
  • A web browser takes you anywhere on the internet, letting you see text, images and video from anywhere in the world.
  • The web is a vast and powerful tool. Over the course of a few decades the internet has changed the way we work, the way we play and the way we interact with one another. Depending on how it’s used, it bridges nations, drives commerce, nurtures relationships, drives the innovation engine of the future and is responsible for more memes than we know what to do with.
  • It’s important that everyone has access to the web, but it’s also vital that we all <a href="%(tools)s">understand the tools</a> we use to access it. We use web browsers like Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge and Apple Safari every day, but do we understand what they are and how they work?
  • In a short period of time we’ve gone from being amazed by the ability to send an email to someone around the world, to a change in how we think of information. It’s not a question of how much you know anymore, but simply a question of what browser or app can get you to that information fastest.
  • In a short period of time we’ve gone from being amazed by the ability to send an email to someone around the world, to a change in how we think about information.
  • How does a web browser work?
  • A web browser takes you anywhere on the internet. It retrieves information from other parts of the web and displays it on your desktop or mobile device. The information is transferred using the Hypertext Transfer Protocol, which defines how text, images and video are transmitted on the web. This information needs to be shared and displayed in a consistent format so that people using any browser, anywhere in the world can see the information.
  • Sadly, not all browser makers choose to interpret the format in the same way. For users, this means that a website can look and function differently. Creating consistency between browsers, so that any user can enjoy the internet, regardless of the browser they choose, is called <a href="%(standards)s">web standards</a>.
  • When the web browser fetches data from an internet connected server and it then uses a piece of software called a rendering engine to translate that data into text and images. This data is written in <a href="%(html)s">Hypertext Markup Language</a> (HTML) and web browsers read this code to create what we see, hear and experience on the internet.
  • <a href="%(hyperlink)s">Hyperlinks</a> allow users to follow a path to other pages or sites on the web. Every webpage, image and video has its own unique <a href="%(url)s">Uniform Resource Locator</a> (URL), which is also known as a web address. When a browser visits a server for data, the web address tells the browser where to look for each item that is described in the html, which then tells the browser where it goes on the web page.
  • Cookies (not the yummy kind)
  • Websites save information about you in files called <a href="%(cookies)s">cookies</a>. They are saved on your computer for the next time you visit that site. Upon your return, the website code will read that file to see that it’s you. For example, when you go to a website and the page remembers your username and password – that’s made possible by a cookie.
  • There are also cookies that remember more detailed information about you. Perhaps your interests, your web browsing patterns, etc. This means that a site can provide you more targeted content – often in the form of ads. There are types of cookies, called <em>third-party</em> cookies, that come from sites you’re not even visiting at the time and can track you from site to site to gather information about you, which is sometimes sold to other companies. Sometimes you can block these kinds of cookies, though not all browsers allow you to.
  • When you go to a website and the page remembers your username and password – that’s made possible by a cookie.
  • Nearly all major browsers have a private browsing setting. These exist to hide the browsing history from other users on the same computer. Many people think that private browsing or incognito mode will hide both their identity and browsing history from internet service providers, governments and advertisers. They don’t. These settings just clear the history on your system, which is helpful if you’re dealing with sensitive personal information on a shared or public computer. Firefox goes beyond that.
  • Firefox helps you be more private online by letting you block trackers from following you around the web.
  • Making your web browser work for you
  • Most major web browsers let users modify their experience through extensions or add-ons. Extensions are bits of software that you can add to your browser to customize it or add functionality. Extensions can do all kinds of fun and practical things like enabling new features, foreign language dictionaries, or visual appearances and themes.
  • All browser makers develop their products to display images and video as quickly and smoothly as possible making it easy for you to make the most of the web. They all work hard to make sure users have a browser that is fast, powerful and easy to use. Where they differ is why. It’s important to choose the right browser for you. Mozilla builds Firefox to ensure that users have control over their online lives and to ensure that the internet is a global, public resource, accessible to all.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}