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Lang format file checker cs

www.mozilla.orglang

Repository: https://github.com/mozilla-l10n/www.mozilla.org/tree/master/cs/

DONE

download_button.lang firefox/accounts-2019.lang firefox/adblocker.lang firefox/all-unified.lang firefox/all.lang firefox/best-browser.lang firefox/campaign-trailhead.lang firefox/campaign.lang firefox/channel/index.lang firefox/facebookcontainer/index.lang firefox/features/bookmarks.lang firefox/features/fast.lang firefox/features/independent.lang firefox/features/index.lang firefox/features/memory.lang firefox/features/password-manager.lang firefox/features/private-browsing.lang firefox/features/send-tabs.lang firefox/features/sync.lang firefox/hub/home-quantum.lang firefox/installer-help.lang firefox/mobile.lang firefox/new/quantum.lang firefox/new/trailhead.lang firefox/nightly_firstrun.lang firefox/nightly_whatsnew.lang firefox/products/developer-quantum.lang firefox/profile-per-install.lang firefox/sendto.lang firefox/shared.lang firefox/switch.lang firefox/tracking-protection-tour.lang firefox/whatsnew.lang firefox/whatsnew_61.lang firefox/whatsnew_63.lang firefox/whatsnew_66.lang firefox/whatsnew_67.lang firefox/whatsnew_69.lang firefox/whatsnew_70.lang foundation/advocacy.lang foundation/annualreport/2011.lang foundation/annualreport/2011faq.lang foundation/index.lang foundation/issues.lang foundation/leadership-network.lang legal/index.lang main.lang mozorg/404.lang mozorg/500.lang mozorg/about-2019.lang mozorg/about/history-details.lang mozorg/about/history.lang mozorg/about/manifesto.lang mozorg/contribute/index.lang mozorg/contribute/signup.lang mozorg/contribute/stories.lang mozorg/home/index-quantum.lang mozorg/internet-health/decentralization.lang mozorg/internet-health/digital-inclusion.lang mozorg/internet-health/index.lang mozorg/internet-health/open-innovation.lang mozorg/internet-health/privacy-security.lang mozorg/internet-health/shared.lang mozorg/internet-health/web-literacy.lang mozorg/mission.lang mozorg/newsletters.lang mozorg/plugincheck-update.lang mozorg/products.lang mozorg/technology.lang newsletter.lang privacy/faq.lang privacy/index.lang privacy/principles.lang

TODO

firefox/home-master.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • Firefox - Protect your life online with privacy-first products
  • Firefox is more than a browser. Learn more about Firefox products that handle your data with respect and are built for privacy anywhere you go online.
  • The browser is just the beginning
  • Meet our family of products
  • Get 2,000+ trackers off your trail — including Facebook
  • Know when hackers strike — and stay a step ahead
  • Start getting breach reports
  • Keep your passwords safe on every device
  • Learn more about Lockwise
  • Get the <strong>respect</strong> you deserve
  • Every single Firefox product honors our Personal Data Promise: <strong>Take less. Keep it safe. No secrets.</strong>
  • Share large files without prying eyes
  • Start sending files safely
  • Trade clickbait for quality content
  • Learn more about Pocket
  • One login. All your devices. A family of products that respect your <strong>privacy</strong>.
  • Learn more about joining Firefox
  • Get the browser extension
  • Get the Facebook Container extension
  • Download the browser
  • Download the app
  • Desktop
  • Browsers

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

footer.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • Developers
  • Company
  • Careers
  • Test New Features
  • MDN Web Docs
  • Tools
  • Resources
  • Contact
  • Product Help
  • Support
  • File a Bug
  • Community Participation Guidelines
  • Portions of this content are ©1998–%(current_year)s by individual mozilla.org contributors. Content available under a <a rel="license" href="%(url)s">Creative Commons license</a>.
  • Press
  • Brand Standards
  • Browsers
  • Enterprise
  • Products
  • Join
  • Sign Up
  • Sign In
  • Benefits
  • Beta for Android
  • Nightly for Android
  • Visit <a %(moco_link)s>Mozilla Corporation’s</a> not-for-profit parent, the <a %(mofo_link)s>Mozilla Foundation</a>.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/browser-history.lang

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Original English source file
Your translated file
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Strings identical to English:

  • Browser History: Epic power struggles that brought us modern browsers
  • The browser wars, underdogs vs giants, and moments that changed the world. Read about the history of the web browser.
  • The History of Web Browsers
  • World history is rife with epic power struggles, world-conquering tyrants, and heroic underdogs. The history of web browsers isn’t very different. University pioneers wrote simple software that sparked an information revolution, and battle for browser superiority and internet users.
  • Before Web Era
  • In 1950, computers took up whole rooms and were dumber than today’s pocket calculators. But progress was swift, and by 1960 they were able to run complex programs. Governments and universities across the globe thought it would be great if the machines could talk, nurturing collaboration and scientific breakthroughs.
  • <a href="%(arpanet)s">ARPANET</a> was the first successful networking project and in 1969 the first message was sent from the computer science lab at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) to Stanford Research Institute (SRI), also in California.
  • That sparked a revolution in computer networking. New networks formed, connecting universities and research centers across the globe. But for the next 20 years, the internet wasn’t accessible to the public. It was restricted to university and government researchers, students, and private corporations. There were dozens of programs that could trade information over telephone lines, but none of them were easy to use. The real open internet, and the first web browser, wasn’t created until 1990.
  • Web Era
  • British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee created the first web server and graphical web browser in 1990 while <a href="%(cern)s">working at CERN</a>, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in Switzerland. He called his new window into the internet “WorldWideWeb.” It was an easy-to-use graphical interface created for the NeXT computer. For the first time, text documents were linked together over a public network—the web as we know it.
  • A year later, Berners-Lee asked CERN math student Nicola Pellow to write the Line Mode Browser, a program for basic computer terminals.
  • By 1993, the web exploded. Universities, governments, and private corporations all saw opportunity in the open internet. Everyone needed new computer programs to access it. That year, Mosaic was created at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign by computer scientist Marc Andreessen. It was the very first popular web browser and the early ancestor of <a href="%(firefox)s">Mozilla Firefox</a>.
  • NCSA Mosaic ran on Windows computers, was easy to use, and gave anyone with a PC access to early web pages, chat rooms, and image libraries. The next year (1994), Andreessen founded <a href="%(netscape)s">Netscape</a> and released Netscape Navigator to the public. It was wildly successful, and the first browser for the people. It was also the first move in a new kind of war for internet users.
  • The Browser Wars
  • By 1995, Netscape Navigator wasn’t the only way to get online. Computer software giant Microsoft licensed the old Mosaic code and built its own window to the web, <a href="%(ie)s">Internet Explorer</a>. The release sparked a war. Netscape and Microsoft worked feverishly to make new versions of their programs, each attempting to outdo the other with faster, better products.
  • Netscape created and released JavaScript, which gave websites powerful computing capabilities they never had before. (They also made the infamous <a href="%(blink)s">&lt;blink&gt; tag</a>.) Microsoft countered with Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), which became the standard for web page design.
  • Things got a little out of hand in 1997 when Microsoft released Internet Explorer 4.0. The team built a giant letter “e” and snuck it on the lawn of Netscape headquarters. The Netscape team promptly knocked the giant “e” over and <a href="%(dino)s">put their own Mozilla dinosaur mascot on top of it</a>.
  • Then Microsoft began shipping Internet Explorer with their Windows operating system. Within 4 years, it had 75%% of the market and by 1999 it had 99%% of the market. The company faced antitrust litigation over the move, and Netscape decided to open source its codebase and created the not-for-profit <a href="%(mozilla)s">Mozilla</a>, which went on to create and release Firefox in 2002. Realizing that having a browser monopoly wasn’t in the best interests of users and the open web, Firefox was created to provide choice for web users. By 2010, Mozilla Firefox and others had <a href="%(marketshare)s">reduced Internet Explorer’s market share to 50%%</a>.
  • Other competitors emerged during the late ‘90s and early 2000s, including Opera, Safari, and Google Chrome. Microsoft Edge replaced Internet Explorer with the release of Windows 10 in 2015.
  • Browsing the Web Today
  • Today there are just a handful of ways to access the internet. Firefox, Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Safari and Opera are the main competitors. Mobile devices have emerged during the past decade as the preferred way to access the internet. Today, most internet users only use mobile browsers and <a href="%(applications)s">applications</a> to get online. Mobile versions of the major browsers are available for iOS and Android devices. While these apps are very useful for specific purposes, they only provide limited access to the web.
  • In the future, the web will likely stray further from its hypertext roots to become a vast sea of interactive experiences. Virtual reality has been on the horizon for decades (at least since the release of Lawnmower Man in 1992 and the Nintendo Virtual Boy in 1995), but the web may finally bring it to the masses. Firefox now has support for <a href="%(vr)s">WebVR and A-Frame</a>, which let developers quickly and easily build virtual reality websites. Most modern mobile devices support <a href="%(vr)s">WebVR</a>, and can easily be used as headsets with simple cardboard cases. A 3D virtual reality web like the one imagined by science fiction author Neal Stephenson may be just around the corner. If that’s the case, the web browser itself may completely disappear and become a true window into another world.
  • Whatever the future of the web holds, Mozilla and Firefox will be there for users, ensuring that they have powerful tools to experience the web and all it has to offer. The web is for everyone, and everyone should have control of their online experience. That’s why we give Firefox tools to protect user privacy and we never sell user data to advertisers.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/what-is-a-browser.lang

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Original English source file
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Strings identical to English:

  • What is a web browser?
  • A web browser takes you anywhere on the internet, letting you see text, images and video from anywhere in the world.
  • The web is a vast and powerful tool. Over the course of a few decades the internet has changed the way we work, the way we play and the way we interact with one another. Depending on how it’s used, it bridges nations, drives commerce, nurtures relationships, drives the innovation engine of the future and is responsible for more memes than we know what to do with.
  • It’s important that everyone has access to the web, but it’s also vital that we all <a href="%(tools)s">understand the tools</a> we use to access it. We use web browsers like Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge and Apple Safari every day, but do we understand what they are and how they work?
  • In a short period of time we’ve gone from being amazed by the ability to send an email to someone around the world, to a change in how we think of information. It’s not a question of how much you know anymore, but simply a question of what browser or app can get you to that information fastest.
  • In a short period of time we’ve gone from being amazed by the ability to send an email to someone around the world, to a change in how we think about information.
  • How does a web browser work?
  • A web browser takes you anywhere on the internet. It retrieves information from other parts of the web and displays it on your desktop or mobile device. The information is transferred using the Hypertext Transfer Protocol, which defines how text, images and video are transmitted on the web. This information needs to be shared and displayed in a consistent format so that people using any browser, anywhere in the world can see the information.
  • Sadly, not all browser makers choose to interpret the format in the same way. For users, this means that a website can look and function differently. Creating consistency between browsers, so that any user can enjoy the internet, regardless of the browser they choose, is called <a href="%(standards)s">web standards</a>.
  • When the web browser fetches data from an internet connected server and it then uses a piece of software called a rendering engine to translate that data into text and images. This data is written in <a href="%(html)s">Hypertext Markup Language</a> (HTML) and web browsers read this code to create what we see, hear and experience on the internet.
  • <a href="%(hyperlink)s">Hyperlinks</a> allow users to follow a path to other pages or sites on the web. Every webpage, image and video has its own unique <a href="%(url)s">Uniform Resource Locator</a> (URL), which is also known as a web address. When a browser visits a server for data, the web address tells the browser where to look for each item that is described in the html, which then tells the browser where it goes on the web page.
  • Cookies (not the yummy kind)
  • Websites save information about you in files called <a href="%(cookies)s">cookies</a>. They are saved on your computer for the next time you visit that site. Upon your return, the website code will read that file to see that it’s you. For example, when you go to a website and the page remembers your username and password – that’s made possible by a cookie.
  • There are also cookies that remember more detailed information about you. Perhaps your interests, your web browsing patterns, etc. This means that a site can provide you more targeted content – often in the form of ads. There are types of cookies, called <em>third-party</em> cookies, that come from sites you’re not even visiting at the time and can track you from site to site to gather information about you, which is sometimes sold to other companies. Sometimes you can block these kinds of cookies, though not all browsers allow you to.
  • When you go to a website and the page remembers your username and password – that’s made possible by a cookie.
  • Nearly all major browsers have a private browsing setting. These exist to hide the browsing history from other users on the same computer. Many people think that private browsing or incognito mode will hide both their identity and browsing history from internet service providers, governments and advertisers. They don’t. These settings just clear the history on your system, which is helpful if you’re dealing with sensitive personal information on a shared or public computer. Firefox goes beyond that.
  • Firefox helps you be more private online by letting you block trackers from following you around the web.
  • Making your web browser work for you
  • Most major web browsers let users modify their experience through extensions or add-ons. Extensions are bits of software that you can add to your browser to customize it or add functionality. Extensions can do all kinds of fun and practical things like enabling new features, foreign language dictionaries, or visual appearances and themes.
  • All browser makers develop their products to display images and video as quickly and smoothly as possible making it easy for you to make the most of the web. They all work hard to make sure users have a browser that is fast, powerful and easy to use. Where they differ is why. It’s important to choose the right browser for you. Mozilla builds Firefox to ensure that users have control over their online lives and to ensure that the internet is a global, public resource, accessible to all.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}