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firefox/accounts-2019.lang firefox/all-unified.lang firefox/browsers.lang firefox/campaign-trailhead.lang firefox/campaign.lang firefox/channel/index.lang firefox/compare/shared.lang firefox/facebookcontainer/index.lang firefox/features/bookmarks.lang firefox/features/fast.lang firefox/features/independent.lang firefox/features/index.lang firefox/features/memory.lang firefox/features/password-manager.lang firefox/features/private-browsing.lang firefox/features/send-tabs.lang firefox/features/sync.lang firefox/home-master.lang firefox/hub/home-quantum.lang firefox/installer-help.lang firefox/mobile-2019.lang firefox/new/quantum.lang firefox/new/trailhead.lang firefox/nightly_firstrun.lang firefox/products.lang firefox/products/developer-quantum.lang firefox/set-default-thanks.lang firefox/shared.lang firefox/welcome/page3.lang firefox/welcome/page4.lang firefox/welcome/page5.lang firefox/welcome/page6.lang firefox/welcome/page7.lang firefox/whatsnew.lang firefox/whatsnew_70.lang firefox/whatsnew_71.lang firefox/whatsnew_73.lang firefox/whatsnew_74.lang firefox/whatsnew_75.lang firefox/windows-64-bit.lang legal/index.lang main.lang mozorg/404.lang mozorg/500.lang mozorg/contribute/index.lang mozorg/home/index-quantum.lang mozorg/products.lang newsletter.lang privacy/principles.lang

TODO

firefox/adblocker.lang

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Original English source file
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Strings identical to English:

  • To start, click on the Firefox menu in the top right-hand corner of your screen. It looks like three lines stacked on top of each other. In the drop-down menu, click on Content Blocking. You should see a blue pop-up with different selections.
  • If ads don’t bother you and you don’t mind being followed by trackers and third-party cookies, then the Standard setting should work for you. To get trackers off your tail in Standard mode, use a <a href="%(url)s">Private Browsing</a> window.
  • The Custom setting gives you the ultimate choice. You can decide what you’re blocking, including trackers, cookies and more. If you allow cookies from a website, you’ll automatically be in Custom mode.
  • Click on the Trackers box and you’ll be able to block trackers in two ways. One way to block trackers is to do it when you’re working in a Private Window. Another way to do it is to block trackers in all windows. Keep in mind that if you choose to always block trackers, some pages might not load correctly.
  • <a href="%(url)s">Cookies</a> are sent by websites you visit. They live on your computer and monitor what you’ve been doing on a site. When an airline hikes your rates because you’ve looked at plane tickets once that day, that is the handiwork of a cookie.
  • In Firefox, you can block all third-party cookies or just those set by trackers. Be aware that blocking all cookies can break some sites.
  • If you don’t want your online behavior used for ads, you can send websites a polite “thanks but no thanks” letter by checking the <a href="%(url)s">Do Not Track</a> option of Firefox. Participation is voluntary, but the websites that participate will stop tracking you immediately.
  • In some cases, an ad blocker can help your browser go faster. When an ad is loading, it can slow down a website. At the same time, it takes longer to find what you’re looking for if you’re too busy closing yet another ad.
  • If you want to learn more about ad blocking, there are hundreds of ad blocker extensions available for Firefox and other browsers. If want to try out the ad blockers Firefox uses, <a href="%(url)s">click here to download</a> a browser that puts privacy first.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

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firefox/best-browser.lang

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  • The internet has become as essential as electricity and running water, so choosing the best browser for you is more important than ever. The internet is a second office, a teacher and sometimes a medical advisor, even if your actual doctor would prefer you didn’t look up your symptoms online.
  • Today is a different story. Ads, privacy hacks, security breaches, and fake news might have you looking at other qualities in a browser. How does the browser protect your privacy? Does it allow trackers to follow you across the web? Does it built to multitask and handle many computer and internet operations at once?
  • Marshall Erwin, Senior Director of Trust and Security at Mozilla
  • A browser is still a tool, so it makes sense that you’ll want to pick the best one for the job. If you’re a human who needs to work to survive, you’ll need a fast internet browser. One thing to keep in mind is a browser that runs third-party trackers is more likely to be slower than a browser that doesn’t. Third-party trackers are cookies, and while you can’t see them, they are running in the background of the site, taking up precious time. The more third-party trackers a browser blocks, the faster it can run.
  • This is one of the many reasons to choose the Firefox browser: Firefox blocks third-party trackers by default. We have other reasons and we’ll get into those later.
  • Remember the last massive data breach? If not, it’s probably because it happens so often. Companies hold on to customer data, like their personal or financial information, and hackers steal it. If you’re making safety a priority, then a secure internet browser is the best browser for you.
  • There are a few ways a browser can help its users stay secure. A browser that is up to date with the latest security tech can help protect your computer and websites from unwanted visitors, such as malware or computer viruses.
  • The second is not storing too much user data. Hackers can’t steal what’s not there, which is why Firefox keeps a minimum amount of information about its users. <a href="%(data)s">Firefox knows</a> if you use the browser and your general location <a href="%(privacy)s">but not the name of your childhood pet or your favorite color.</a>
  • Last but not least, a safe browser should offer tools to help you keep an eye on your accounts. Think of alerts that go straight to your email if any of your accounts get breached or icons that tell you whether a website is encrypted, (i.e., if it’s a good idea to enter your credit number on a shopping site).
  • Firefox is offering something new to keep you safe: <a href="%(monitor)s">Firefox Monitor</a>. It’s a free service that will alert you if there are any public hacks on your accounts and let you know if your accounts got hacked in the past. Another neat feature is the Green Lock. It looks like a small green icon at the top left side of the browser window. If you’re on Firefox and see the green lock, it means the website is encrypted and secure. If the lock is grey, you might want to think twice about entering any sensitive information.
  • We visit hundreds or even thousands of websites each day, and you can’t expect users to make security and privacy decisions for each of these sites. That is why a browser that gives you more control is so important - because it offers real, meaningful protection.
  • Privacy on the web is a hot button issue. If privacy is number one on your list of priorities, you want to look for a browser that takes that seriously. When choosing the best private browser for you, look at the tracking policy and how a browser handles your data. These seem like technical questions, but they’re the reason some browsers are more private than others.
  • Trackers are all those annoying “cookies” messages you get on airline sites. These third-party trackers know where you click and can be used to analyze your behavior. A private browser should give users the option to turn off third-party trackers, but ideally, turn them off by default.
  • Another way to stop trackers from tracking is using private mode to browse. Any browser that claims to be private should offer browsing in private mode.
  • One easy way to check is to visit a browser’s content setting page and privacy policy. The privacy webpage should outline if your data is shared and why. It’s why the <a href="%(privacy)s">Firefox privacy notice</a> is easy to read and easy to find.
  • Choosing the best browser for you is a lot like choosing a home. You want to explore your options, do some research and make a decision based on what’s important to you.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/compare.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • In addition to privacy protection, which largely takes place in the background of the browser, another key ingredient to a well-made browser is the actual user interface and functionality. Almost all six browsers are equal when it comes to tab browsing, bookmark management, auto-completion, proofreading and extensions. Firefox, Edge and Opera also offer a quick screenshot function that proves to be quite handy and is definitely something you notice is missing when you switch over to a browser without it.
  • The first thing to point out about portability is that not all browsers run on all operating systems. While Firefox, Chrome and Opera work on all major systems and are easy to install, Internet Explorer, Edge and Safari only work on Microsoft and Apple’s own systems. The mobile version of Safari is pre-installed on Apple’s mobile devices, and most Android devices come with a pre-installed browser modified by the manufacturer for the device. Firefox, Chrome, Edge and Opera can easily be installed and even used side by side.
  • Almost all of the browsers compared here allow synchronization between desktop and mobile devices. You’ll need an account to do it, which you can use to log into the browser on all devices and synchronize things like passwords, browsing history, bookmarks and settings.
  • Browsers have come a long way since Chrome was introduced and took over the market share. Most of the modern browsers have closed the gap on portability and functionality, and in some areas, like speed and privacy, have actually surpassed Chrome. Still, determining which browser is right for you will always depend on your individual needs and what you value most as you navigate online.
  • The comparisons made here were done so across browser release versions as follows:
  • Firefox puts your privacy first — in everything we make and do. We believe you have the right to decide how and with whom you share your personal information. Firefox collects as little data as possible and never sells it. The little data we do collect is only used to make products and features better. No secrets. But a lot of transparency and real privacy.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/compare/chrome.lang

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  • At Firefox, we have a huge number of dedicated users who appreciate our steadfast dedication to online privacy. For example, the latest version of Firefox includes a feature called Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) which is turned on by default for all users worldwide. ETP blocks over 2,000 trackers, including social trackers from companies like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. It also has an integrated feature called <a %(attrs)s>Firefox Monitor</a> that automatically notifies you if your password has been breached or needs to be updated. In addition to these protections, Firefox's Private Browsing mode automatically deletes your browsing information such as history and cookies, leaving no trace after you finish your session.
  • We’ve also recently restated our commitment to privacy and transparency regarding user data in our most recent <a %(attrs)s>Privacy Notice</a> that states, “At Mozilla, we believe that privacy is fundamental to a healthy internet.”
  • Google Chrome is by all accounts a secure browser, with features like Google Safe Browsing, which helps protect users by displaying an impossible-to-miss warning when they attempt to navigate to dangerous sites or download dangerous files.
  • In fact, both Chrome and Firefox have rigorous security in place. Both include a thing called “sandboxing” which separates the processes of the browser so something like a harmful website doesn’t infect other parts of your laptop or other device.
  • While Chrome proves to be a safe web browser, its privacy record is questionable. Google actually collects a disturbingly large amount of data from its users including location, search history and site visits. Google makes its case for data collection saying it’s doing it to improve its services – like helping you find a sweater or a coffee shop like the one you previously bought or visited. However, others might disagree, making the point that Google is actually gathering an unprecedented amount of data for its own marketing purposes. They tout that they’re keeping your information private from hackers, but that’s beside the point. Google itself runs the world’s largest advertising network, thanks in large part to data they harvest from their users.
  • Ultimately, it’s up to you to decide whether or not or where to draw the line with sharing things like your search history and shopping history. But if you’re anything like most people, you’ve probably searched for some things on the internet that you would rather keep private.
  • In terms of features, both Firefox and Chrome offer a large library of extensions and plug-ins, with Chrome’s catalog vastly outnumbering any other browser while nicely integrating with other Google services, like Gmail and Google Docs.
  • Although not as extensive as Chrome’s add-on library, Firefox, as open-source software with a huge number of active contributors, also features an incredible number of useful extensions.
  • Firefox also has a sync feature to see your open and recent tabs, browsing history, and bookmarks across all your devices.
  • While Chrome gets the nod with add-ons and extensions, Firefox has a nicely curated set of built-in features, such as the incredibly handy screen capture tool, and reading mode feature which strips away everything from the page except the text from the article you’re reading.
  • If having tons of open tabs is your thing, then it really comes down to your UI preference. Firefox features a horizontal scroll on all your open tabs rather than shrinking them smaller and smaller with each new one. Google Chrome prefers to shrink them down so just the favicon is visible. The only problem with this is when you have multiple tabs open from the same website, so you see the same favicon across your tabs.
  • As for customization, our fans will tell you one of the things they love most about our browser is its ability to allow you to move and arrange a majority of the UI elements to best suit your needs. Chrome allows you to hide certain UI elements but there’s not much allowance, if any, for moving things around based on your preferences. However, it should be noted that both Chrome and Firefox make it pretty easy to change your browser’s appearance and theme.
  • Both Chrome and Firefox also allow you to sync things like passwords, bookmarks, and open tabs across all your devices. If you have a Firefox account, you can manually send an open tab on your desktop to your mobile device or vice versa. With Chrome, it’s done automatically if you’ve chosen that setting in your preferences. Not having to manually send the tab from one device to the other is convenient when you want to do something like continue reading an article you didn’t finish earlier. But there could be times where automatic syncing might not be ideal if there’s a chance multiple users are browsing while signed in to your Google account.
  • We think it’s fair to say Firefox and Chrome are really neck and neck in terms of portability and utility, with Chrome having a slight edge in utility because of its huge library of extensions and add-on features. But in terms of Privacy, Firefox wins the day with our commitment to preserving our users’ online data and providing free baked-in services like password managers that also alert you if there happens to be a data breach involving your credentials.
  • For practical purposes, there’s obviously really nothing preventing you from using both browsers—Firefox for those moments in life when privacy really matters, and Chrome if you’re still invested in the Google ecosystem. Yet with the growing number of incursions into our personal data, Firefox may prove to be the right choice in the long run for those of us who value protecting our personal privacy online.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/compare/edge.lang

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  • Compare Microsoft Edge to the Firefox Browser to find out which is the better browser for you.
  • Comparing Firefox Browser with Microsoft Edge
  • With Windows 10, Microsoft introduced its Edge browser to compete with Firefox and Chrome making it the default browser pre-installed on millions of PCs sold. Even so, users were slow to adopt it and Microsoft eventually announced plans to relaunch Edge as a Chromium-based browser (Chromium of course being Google’s Open Source browser project).
  • Here we’ll compare our Firefox Browser to the Chromium-based Microsoft Edge in terms of privacy, utility, and portability, to help you have a better understanding of which browser better suits your needs and preferences.
  • Edge is integrated into the Windows 10 platform and runs in a sandbox environment, meaning it isolates programs and prevents malicious programs from spying on your computer. It has a built-in SmartScreen that scans the reputation of sites you visit and blocks suspicious sites. To enhance privacy, Edge allows you to use biometrics or a PIN with Windows Hello instead of passwords for online authentication.
  • However, Edge saves some of your private data and sends it back to Microsoft with Windows updates. At 45 cryptically worded pages long, the privacy policy for Edge is unlikely to be read or understood by the average user.
  • At Firefox, our <a %(attrs)s>privacy policy</a> is transparent and in plain language. We actually put a lot of work into making sure it was straightforward and easy to read. We pride ourselves in protecting our users security and privacy. With Enhanced Tracking Protection now on by default, we block 2000+ trackers automatically. Trackers are those little pieces of code that try to piece together what you're doing across multiple internet sites to build a composite and detailed picture of who you are, compromising your privacy all just to target better ads.
  • Your <a %(attrs)s>Privacy Protections</a> shows you the trackers and cookies that pages have attempted to leave, and how many Firefox has blocked for you.
  • In Firefox, Private Browsing mode automatically erases your browsing information like passwords, cookies, and history, leaving no trace after you close out the session. Edge on the other hand, actually records browsing history in their private mode (called “InPrivate”) and it’s a relatively easy task for someone to reconstruct your full browsing history, regardless of whether your browsing was done in regular or InPrivate mode.
  • Both browsers are relatively equal in terms of data encryption. However, if online privacy and transparency are important to you, then Firefox is clearly a better choice here.
  • Firefox is a fast and open source browser, which means users can customize their browsing experience in every way possible. Firefox also allows the casual user several different ways to customize the UI with applying different themes and toolbar configurations. Since our browser has always been open source we have a large following of devoted developers who have created an extensive library of add-ons and browser extensions.
  • Since Edge has moved to the processor intensive Chromium platform, you can expect it to run a little slower, especially if you have multiple programs running at once. However, with Chromium platform comes a massive library of extensions as well as a decent level of UI customization that Edge did not have before it’s move to Chromium.
  • Edge has some nice UI features, like their tab previews which can make it easy to find the right open tabs if you’ve got a lot of them open. Another helpful tab-related feature lets you set aside any active tabs that you aren’t using but don’t want to close down.
  • Firefox features a scrolling tab interface, which keeps tab information viewable and scrolls them horizontally instead of shrinking them down to just favicon size. Also whenever you open a new tab, our <a %(attrs)s>Pocket feature</a> suggests relevant articles and content for you. Plus with Pocket, you can also save articles, videos, and other content with one click, for reading at a later time.
  • Firefox and Edge both offer excellent reading modes. With Firefox you just tap on the small icon in the search bar and the browser strips down all unnecessary elements and presents you a clean looking article. In Edge you just tap on the small book icon and browser to get a clean easy-to-read UI.
  • Firefox also includes lots of handy built-in features by default like <a %(attrs)s>Enhanced Tracking Protection</a>, a built-in screenshot tool, large file sending and more.
  • Out of the gate, Firefox has more features and integrations built into the browser and readily available on download. And while both browsers have a tremendous number of add-ons and extensions available, Edge’s compatibility with Google’s Chromium platform gives it the advantage in terms of sheer numbers.
  • With Internet Explorer, Microsoft learned from its lack of availability across platforms and made Edge available for macOS and Android. The software is now readily available on iOS, Android, Windows and Mac.
  • Firefox has been available on iOS, Android, Windows, macOS and Linux for years. And as you would expect with any modern browser, Firefox lets you log in with a <a %(attrs)s>free account</a> and sync data such as passwords, browsing history, bookmarks, and open tabs between your computer, tablet and phone. It also allows you to sync across platforms as well.
  • Edge also allows you to connect your associated Microsoft account and sign in to sync your favorites, history, passwords, and more between your computer and iOS or Android devices, although some Android tablets are not currently supported.
  • Aside from sucking up a lot of computing power, Edge running on Chromium has answered a lot of users’ needs for functionality and features. But there’s still a lot to account for in terms of the browser’s privacy protections. It’s our assessment that Firefox is still a better choice for most people to use in their daily lives, based not only on functionality but more importantly on our transparency in how we collect user data, what exactly we collect, and what we do with it. Because our parent company is <a %(attrs)s>Mozilla</a>, a non-profit organization dedicated to internet privacy and freedom, we simply have a different set of priorities when it comes to users’ data.
  • The bottom line is that while we suggest using Firefox, the best browser for you ultimately will be the one that fits your individual needs with extension support, browsing tools customization, speed, privacy and security.
  • The comparisons made here were done so across browser release versions as follows:<br> Firefox (70) | Edge (44)

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/compare/ie.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • Firefox vs. Internet Explorer: Which is the better browser for you?
  • Compare Internet Explorer to the Firefox Browser to find out which is the better browser for you.
  • Comparing Firefox Browser with Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • While Microsoft’s Internet Explorer still comes pre-installed on most Windows-based PCs, clearly Microsoft would prefer you to use their Edge browser, which is set as the default when you purchase.
  • Microsoft discontinued its Internet Explorer brand several years ago, in favor of its updated Edge browser for Windows 10. However, slow adoption for Edge created room for Internet Explorer to live on, mainly for business compatibility reasons.
  • Here we’ll compare our Firefox Browser with Internet Explorer in terms of security, utility, and portability. We’ll help you understand the differences between how a modern browser like Firefox that adheres to web standards compares with the browser you may be using for business purposes or out of old habits that die hard.
  • If you haven’t moved on from using Internet Explorer, the security risk factor alone should be enough to convince you. <a %(attrs)s>Microsoft’s own security chief has warned</a> millions of people who continue to use Internet Explorer as their main web browser that they are placing themselves in “peril.”
  • Microsoft is no longer supporting new development for Internet Explorer, which means security concerns are rampant. Microsoft openly acknowledges the fact that vulnerabilities exist within basically every version of Internet Explorer.
  • So what’s the solution if your company is running outdated apps that only work on Internet Explorer? Our best advice for you personally is, don’t mix business with pleasure. The simple thing to do is download and use a more secure browser like Firefox. Then, if you need to do things like check your personal email or shop online, you can just switch over to the more secure browser. The bottom line is, if Microsoft is warning people not to use Internet Explorer, don’t use it. Your online privacy and security are not worth risking because you (or your company) have a hard time breaking an old habit. We make Firefox with security and privacy features like <a %(lockwise)s>Lockwise</a>, our password manager, private browsing and lots of other add-ons that help us make the web safer for you. Also, our <a %(privacy)s>Privacy Policy</a> is straightforward: we tell you what we know about you, and why we collect that information. All of these things obviously go beyond what Internet Explorer offers, and even what other modern browsers like Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge offer.
  • Alarmingly, 4 to 5% of all desktop web traffic comes through Internet Explorer. That might not seem like a lot, but in reality it means millions of people are being served a poor internet experience with slow loading and rendering times, pages that won’t display properly — all on top of the security issues already discussed.
  • Really the only reasons to use Internet Explorer are for developers to test what their sites look like on an older browser or if a company has business-critical apps that only work with the Internet Explorer browser.
  • On the other end of the spectrum, Firefox is one of the most frequently updated browsers, and comes loaded with lots of useful and interesting features, like <a %(pocket)s>Pocket</a> that suggests interesting content every time you open a new tab. Our unified search and web address bar, or <em>Awesome Bar</em> as we call it, also gives you suggestions based on your existing bookmarks and tags, history, open tabs and popular searches. And with a free Firefox account you also get access to all your settings and <a %(products)s>our other Firefox products</a> on any device simply by signing in. Plus the peace of mind of knowing your browser is proactively working to protect your personal data.
  • As Microsoft has made the move to sunset the Internet Explorer browser, it no longer supports any version for iOS, and has never been available for Android. Which means unless you’re running a Windows-based laptop or desktop, you won’t have access to your bookmarks, browsing history, saved passwords, and other information that modern browsers sync across devices.
  • Firefox works on any platform, including Windows, macOS, Linux, Android and iOS. Which also means you can sync all your information across platforms. So if you’re browsing on a Windows-based laptop, you can pick up where you left off when you move to browsing on your iPhone or Android device. This convenience should come standard with any modern web browser, and is sorely lacking with Internet Explorer.
  • There was a time not so long ago where Internet Explorer was the most popular and widely used browser in the world. Times have changed and so has technology, but unfortunately Internet Explorer has pretty much stayed the same. Microsoft itself openly implores users to stop using Internet Explorer and instead switch to their newer Chromium-based Edge browser.
  • Our opinion is just to go with a trusted, private browser with a track record of delivering a great experience across devices. In a head-to-head comparison, it’s really no contest at all. Firefox is hands down the winner across all assessment categories. If you do find yourself at Nana’s house firing up Internet Explorer, maybe you want to do Nana a favor and <a %(attrs)s>download Firefox</a> for her.
  • The comparisons made here were done so across browser release versions as follows:<br> Firefox (70) | Internet Explorer (11)

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/compare/opera.lang

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18 1 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
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Strings identical to English:

  • Firefox vs. Opera: Which is the better browser for you?
  • Compare Opera to the Firefox Browser to find out which is the best browser for you.
  • Comparing Firefox Browser with Opera
  • The Firefox Browser and Opera are two of the earliest browsers on the scene still releasing frequent updates. While Opera has not reached the same level of user adoption as Firefox or Google Chrome, it’s maintained a relatively stable and loyal base over a sustained period of time. In this review, we’ll compare the Opera browser with our Firefox browser in terms of security and privacy, utility, and portability to help you choose which browser might be the best fit for you.
  • Opera’s privacy policy lacks some specificity in its explanation of which types of information it collects and how, in certain sections, it says they collect names of account holders, IP addresses and search terms. What seems confusing and troubling is the section about International data transfers; when, how often and why they need to transfer your data internationally is not explained.
  • Firefox’s <a %(attrs)s>privacy policy</a> is very transparent in describing what personal information we collect with the only end goal being to give you greater control over the information you share online.
  • As far as actual privacy protections in the Opera browser, it does offer a robust Private mode that allows you to surf the web without the browser tracking your activity. Also in normal browsing mode, you can also turn off some data collection features by digging into the settings to enable the ad blocker and adjust other security features.
  • With the latest version of Firefox, <a %(attrs)s>Enhanced Tracking Protection</a> is turned on by default in normal browsing mode, so you don’t have to mess around with the settings just to protect yourself from trackers. With Enhanced Tracking Protection, Firefox actively blocks thousands of third-party trackers that try to follow you around the web. You are provided with a personalized protection report that shows how often Firefox blocked third-party cookies, social media trackers, fingerprinting tools and cryptominers as you browse the web.
  • We make Firefox for people like you, who care deeply about personal privacy and security. That's why we collect so little info about users and are transparent about how we use that info. It's hard to know how Opera is operating from a privacy perspective. While there are robust privacy features, how they themselves collect and share your data is murky. Firefox remains consistent in what we say and what we do in protecting your privacy.
  • There’s no debate that Opera is a feature-packed browser with a clean user interface and strong customization options. Because Opera is built on Chromium, it can take advantage of most of Google Chrome’s vast extension library. Firefox also features a large <a %(attrs)s>extension library to browse</a>, but not quite as large as Chrome’s.
  • Like Firefox, Opera delivers a scrolling tab experience, which means that when you open more tabs than will fit on screen, it scrolls them off screen instead of just continuously shrinking them down. Also both Firefox and Opera have a screenshot tool that lets you capture a snapshot of your screen or part of the page. However, the Opera tool doesn’t give you the ability to create one huge capture of the whole webpage, only the visible portion.
  • Opera provides a lot of hidden utility within its simple and manageable interface. For example there’s built-in support for messaging apps, like Facebook Messenger. There’s also a news reader that aggregates articles from your choice of sites and news outlets. The parallel feature to this on Firefox is called <a %(attrs)s>Pocket</a>. Pocket is a free service for Firefox account holders that makes it easy to find and save interesting articles and videos from all around the web. In addition, it recommends a variety of articles that expand your knowledge base curated by real, thoughtful humans.
  • In terms of head to head utility, Opera and Firefox are close competitors. Opera may have an advantage in one aspect with its compatibility with and access to Chrome’s huge extension library. But one significant factor to consider is the fact that Opera, because it’s built on Chromium, is a processor-hungry browser with its RAM consumption comparable to Chrome, which is known for its high CPU usage.
  • Both Firefox and Opera are compatible across every platform including Windows, Mac, Linux, Android and iOS. Firefox account holders can easily sync their bookmarks, passwords, open tabs, and browsing history across all their signed into devices. The same is true for Opera users with an account. However, many sites, especially old sites that haven’t been updated in years, block the latest version of Opera entirely. So if visiting places like your Ex’s old blog is important, take heed, you may not be able to access some of the dustier corners of the internet if you use Opera.
  • In addition to the regular mobile app, Opera has two other mobile versions of its browser: Touch and Mini. Touch is light on features but it’s designed to use on the go with only one hand. The Mini version aims at lowering data usage and increased speeds on slow connections by downgrading images and stripping away content.
  • Most major browsers these days, with the exception of Safari, work seamlessly across platforms and browsers. Opera and Firefox are no exception with both browsers providing excellent portability across every device.
  • Overall, Opera is a solid browser, with a clean interface and a lot of useful features available. There are, however, some serious privacy concerns as well as an issue with it using a lot of processing power. Although Opera has some really terrific ease of use features, we still believe Firefox remains a superior browser based on performance and with a transparent user-privacy stance and strict privacy protections.
  • The comparisons made here were done so across browser release versions as follows:<br> Firefox (70) | Opera (60)

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firefox/compare/safari.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • Firefox vs. Safari: Which is the better browser for you?
  • Safari is the pre-installed browser on Mac and iPhone. Compare Safari to the Firefox Browser to find out which is the better browser for you.
  • Comparing Firefox Browser with Apple Safari
  • If you use a Mac or have an iPhone, chances are you’re familiar with the Safari web browser. The fact that it’s pre-installed as the default browser for Apple product users definitely gives it an early advantage, but Firefox has its own set of useful features that make it an attractive alternative. Here we’ll explore the main differences between our browser and Safari in terms of privacy, utility, and portability between devices.
  • Privacy has become a white hot topic for tech companies as they realize more and more people are feeling vulnerable to things like data breaches, ad trackers and hackers. But when it comes down to the real tools people use to navigate the actual interwebs, is it all talk or are they actually taking action to keep your data secure?
  • As alluded to before, Apple is one of those companies that recently decided to step up their privacy game. Not long ago, Apple implemented cross-site tracking prevention in Safari, which prevents ads from following you around the internet. Safari also offers a strong password suggestion when you sign up for a new account on any website. And if you’re invested in the iCloud ecosystem, it syncs that password securely with your other devices, so you never actually have to remember it.
  • Like Safari, we at Firefox have made a point of focusing on privacy and security. But unlike Safari, we’ve been standing on the privacy soap box for a long time. In fact, Mozilla (our parent company) was one of the first voices in the tech community to sound the alarm for online privacy.
  • Our Private Browsing mode blocks trackers and erases your passwords, cookies and history every time you close it. But you can also experience our advanced privacy features even in regular browsing mode. With the latest edition of Firefox, enhanced tracking prevention is turned on by default. This prevents things like cross-site trackers from following you as you jump around the web. Also, with Facebook being caught out almost daily for privacy problems, our <a %(attrs)s>Facebook Container</a> extension makes a lot of sense. It makes it harder for Facebook to track you around the web — similar to what Safari does to prevent cross-site tracking — but Firefox actually isolates your Facebook session into a separate container blocking Facebook from tracking what you do on other websites. Why do they need to know what you look up on WebMD anyway?
  • As far as security goes, Firefox is solid there as well. Any time you’re in Firefox, you can right-click in the password field to securely generate a strong password using the Fill Password option. When you save your new password, we will prompt you to save to its built-in password manager, <a %(lockwise)s>Lockwise</a>. We also serve up users and account holders with another free and useful product called <a %(monitor)s>Monitor</a> that automatically alerts you if your data is included in a known data breach.
  • If you choose to use Safari, you’re in safe hands as long as you’re using an Apple device. But Safari only works on Apple devices, whereas Firefox works on Windows, Mac, iOS, Android and Linux. So no matter what operating system you choose, Firefox has you covered with our security and privacy protections.
  • Apple is widely known for its closed ecosystem as it relates to creating software for its products. But inside the App Store, it does offer a section to developers to create plugins and add-ons to make the browser more robust. These extensions are also browsable through the App Store and easily added to Safari.
  • In addition to the regular set of features you’d expect in a browser, such as tabbed browsing and private browsing, Safari has some unexpected features as well. For instance, if a user were to right-click a word anywhere on a page inside Safari, then click Look Up, they’d get a dictionary definition plus entries from the thesaurus, App Store, movies and more. Safari’s Parental Controls are easy to customize, allowing the adults to breathe a little easier when the kids begin to get curious about the internet.
  • Like Safari, Firefox encourages its enthusiastic developer community to create <a %(attrs)s>add-ons and extensions</a> to the browser. And since our platform is open-source, there’s a vast selection adding a wealth of functionality.
  • Also, when you sign up for a Firefox account you get access to some unique services like Screenshots, <a %(pocket)s>Pocket</a> and <a %(send)s>Send</a> that integrate directly into the browser. Screenshots is a feature built right into the Firefox browser, allowing you to copy or download any or all part of a web page. When you save the screenshot, you can also choose which folder you want to find it in, instead of cluttering your desktop. The Pocket for Firefox button lets you save web pages and videos to Pocket in just one click, so you can read a clean, distraction-free version whenever and wherever you want — even offline. With Send, you can share large files with end-to-end encryption and a variety of security controls, such as the ability to set an expiration time for a file link to expire, the number of downloads, and whether to add an optional password for an extra layer of security.
  • Both browsers have a lot of crossover features, as well as some unique functions. It’s worth mentioning, if you take a lot of screenshots, you’ll wonder how you ever lived without this handy feature that’s built right into Firefox. But if you’re just looking for a fast, private browser for surfing and shopping, then you may want to give Firefox a try — especially if you’ve been exclusively using Safari because it came preloaded as the default browser on your computer. Eventually, you’ll discover which one is more suited to your needs.
  • Firefox and Safari both provide a seamless experience when moving from desktop to mobile browsing or vice versa. For Safari, one of its main strengths is its continuity features. It syncs your bookmarks, tabs, history and more to iCloud so they’re available on all your devices. That means you can open a tab on your iPhone and have it also appear on your Mac laptop with just a click.
  • The Firefox app for <a %(ios)s>iOS</a> and <a %(android)s>Android</a> is one of the fastest browsers available and also has solid security and anti-tracking features — a huge plus if you’re constantly bouncing between a laptop and mobile devices.
  • Since Safari is Apple’s proprietary web browser, its iCloud syncing works exclusively with Apple products. This can be somewhat limiting if, for example, you’re both an Android user and an iPhone user or if you have a Windows based PC for work but use an iPhone as your personal device.
  • Safari does a great job of making the browsing experience simple, fast, and seamless if you’re an Apple user with multiple Apple products. Like Safari, Firefox is a fast and utilitarian browser, but privacy and cross-platform compatibility are our defining features. Firefox updates each month with new features and functionality. For example, one recent update switched on our <a %(attrs)s>Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP)</a> by default for new users, which effectively blocks cookies and cross-site trackers.
  • In the end, it just boils down to what you value in your browser. If you’re integrated with the Apple ecosystem, Safari is still a great choice. But if you value having the latest and greatest privacy protections and being able to work across multiple operating systems, we think Firefox is your best bet. Firefox is also a solid option as a secondary browser for those Apple-exclusive users who may want to switch into a different browser for those online moments that call for extra layers of privacy protection.
  • The comparisons made here were done so across browser release versions as follows:<br> Firefox (70) | Safari (12)

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firefox/enterprise/index.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • Get Firefox for your enterprise with ESR and Rapid Release
  • Get unmatched data protection on the release cadence that suits you with Firefox for enterprise. Download ESR and Rapid Release.
  • Enterprise
  • Overview
  • Downloads
  • Resources
  • Get Firefox for your enterprise
  • Get the <a href="%s">Firefox Extended Support Release or Rapid Release</a> browser for comprehensive data security and data protection.
  • Download
  • Firefox Privacy Notice
  • Unmatched data protection — on the release cadence that suits you
  • The Firefox browser is open source and provides Enhanced Tracking Protection — all part of our longstanding commitment to data protection.
  • Your data stays your business
  • Deploy when and how you want
  • With install packages and a wide expansion of group policies and features, deployment is faster and more flexible than ever — and a breeze in Windows and MacOS environments.
  • Choose your release cadence
  • Get rapid releases to make sure you get the latest features faster, or go extended to ensure a super stable experience.
  • Enterprise downloads
  • Windows 64-bit
  • Select your download
  • Firefox browser
  • Firefox browser - MSI installer
  • Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR)
  • Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) - MSI installer
  • Support
  • MSI installers
  • Legacy browser support
  • ADMX templates
  • Deployment guide
  • Policy documentation
  • Release Notes
  • Documentation and Community Support
  • Sample <a href="%s">plist for configuration profile</a>
  • PKG installer
  • Windows 32-bit
  • Download Firefox ESR or Rapid Release for<br> <a href="%(firefox_all)s">another language or platform.</a>

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firefox/whatsnew_76.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • More time online. More protection.
  • Now Firefox creates and stores strong passwords for more of your online accounts — and stops more trackers than ever before.
  • View your protection report
  • See if you’ve been involved in known online data breaches and take action to resolve them.
  • Share large files with end-to-end encryption, using a link that expires automatically.
  • Try Send
  • Stay connected to the people you can’t be with in real life, and stop Facebook from following you online.
  • Add Facebook Container

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firefox/whatsnew_77.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • What’s new with Firefox
  • Congrats! You’re using the latest version of Firefox.
  • Picture-in-Picture this
  • Got things to do and things to watch? Do both with Picture-in-Picture.
  • Try it out with these cuddly red pandas.
  • Press play and hover your cursor over the video. Then click the blue button to pop the video out.
  • Play the video
  • Ways we’ve been using Picture-in-Picture
  • Watching a lecture or meeting while you take notes
  • Keeping a tutorial video open with a recipe while you cook or bake
  • Entertaining cats, dogs and kids while you get work done
  • Read the <a href="%(notes)s">Release Notes</a> to know more about what’s new in your Firefox Browser.

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mozorg/about-2019.lang

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  • Our leadership has been at the forefront of building a healthier internet since Day 1. What began as an alternative to corporate domination has grown into a global force for good online.
  • When you use the new Firefox, you get a blazing fast experience while supporting Mozilla’s mission to keep the internet healthy, weird and welcoming to all.
  • Walking Our Privacy Talk
  • Talking Internet Issues IRL
  • The principles we wrote in 1998 still guide us today. And in 2018, we created an addendum to emphasize inclusion, privacy and safety for everyone online.
  • With <a href="%(url)s">offices all over the world</a>, we consider the internet from multiple cultures and contexts.
  • <strong>2000</strong> non-employee guests welcomed each year
  • <strong>500</strong> annual attendees to the Berlin speaker series
  • <strong>400</strong> collaborative visits with Mozilla employees each year.
  • <strong>800</strong> bottles of cold brew coffee consumed yearly.
  • Join a mission-driven organization that builds purpose-driven products.
  • Your voice. Your code. Your support. There are so many ways to join the fight for a healthy internet.
  • Stay informed about the issues affecting the internet, and learn how you can get involved in protecting the world’s newest public resource.

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mozorg/about/manifesto.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • The Mozilla Manifesto Addendum
  • These are the principles that guide our mission to promote openness, innovation & opportunity on the web.
  • These are the principles that guide our mission to promote openness, innovation & opportunity on the Web.
  • The open, global internet is the most powerful communication and collaboration resource we have ever seen. It embodies some of our deepest hopes for human progress. It enables new opportunities for learning, building a sense of shared humanity, and solving the pressing problems facing people everywhere.
  • Over the last decade we have seen this promise fulfilled in many ways. We have also seen the power of the internet used to magnify divisiveness, incite violence, promote hatred, and intentionally manipulate fact and reality. We have learned that we should more explicitly set out our aspirations for the human experience of the internet. We do so now.
  • We are committed to an internet that includes all the peoples of the earth — where a person’s demographic characteristics do not determine their online access, opportunities, or quality of experience.
  • We are committed to an internet that elevates critical thinking, reasoned argument, shared knowledge, and verifiable facts.
  • We are committed to an internet that catalyzes collaboration among diverse communities working together for the common good.
  • An internet with these qualities will not come to life on its own. Individuals and organizations must embed these aspirations into internet technology and into the human experience with the internet. The Mozilla Manifesto and Addendum represent Mozilla’s commitment to advancing these aspirations. We aim to work together with people and organizations everywhere who share these goals to make the internet an even better place for everyone.
  • I support the vision of a better, healthier internet from @mozilla, will you join me?
  • Principle 1
  • The internet is an integral part of modern life—a key component in education, communication, collaboration, business, entertainment and society as a whole.
  • Use Open Badges to share your skills and interests
  • Explore how the web impacts science
  • Explore how the Web impacts science
  • Learn about open source code in journalism
  • Principle 2
  • The internet is a global public resource that must remain open and accessible.
  • Read about open internet policy initiatives and developments
  • Read about open Internet policy initiatives and developments
  • Explore how to help keep the web open
  • Explore how to help keep the Web open
  • Principle 3
  • The internet must enrich the lives of individual human beings.
  • See how the web can connect the world to healthcare
  • See how the Web can connect the world to healthcare
  • Explore how the web works
  • Explore how the Web works
  • Principle 4
  • Individuals’ security and privacy on the internet are fundamental and must not be treated as optional.
  • See how Mozilla works to put your privacy first
  • Read about developments in privacy and data safety
  • Learn more about how to protect yourself online
  • Principle 5
  • Individuals must have the ability to shape the internet and their own experiences on it.
  • Individuals must have the ability to shape the Internet and their own experiences on it.
  • Use these free tools to teach the web
  • Use these free tools to teach the Web
  • Learn about creating and curating content for the web
  • Learn about creating and curating content for the Web
  • Principle 6
  • The effectiveness of the internet as a public resource depends upon interoperability (protocols, data formats, content), innovation and decentralized participation worldwide.
  • Set your Do Not Track preference
  • Understand the web ecosystem
  • Understand the Web ecosystem
  • Principle 7
  • Free and open source software promotes the development of the internet as a public resource.
  • Explore how open practices keep the web accessible
  • Explore how open practices keep the Web accessible
  • Learn how to remix content to create something new
  • Learn how to maximize the interactive potential of the web
  • Learn how to maximize the interactive potential of the Web
  • Principle 8
  • Participate in our governance forum
  • Join us as a student ambassador
  • Join us as a <a href="%(volunteer)s">volunteer</a> or <a href="%(ambassador)s">student ambassador</a>
  • Learn how to collaborate online
  • Principle 9
  • Commercial involvement in the development of the internet brings many benefits; a balance between commercial profit and public benefit is critical.
  • Visualize who you interact with on the web with Lightbeam
  • Visualize who you interact with on the Web with Lightbeam
  • See how Firefox phones seek to balance the mobile ecosystem
  • Learn about creating web resources with others
  • Learn about creating Web resources with others
  • Principle 10
  • Magnifying the public benefit aspects of the internet is an important goal, worthy of time, attention and commitment.
  • Host or join a Maker Party
  • Learn how to build online collaboration skills

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mozorg/contribute/stories.lang

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  • Hi, I’m <b class="name">Rubén</b>, a Mozillian in <b class="country">Spain</b>
  • I’ve been collaborating with the Mozilla community since 2004, helping with website localization, QA, user support and community marketing. I’ve also helped organize events in Spain and performed IT tasks within the Mozilla Hispano community.
  • Mozilla Hispano mentorship program
  • Hi, I’m <b class="name">Faye</b>, a Mozillian in <b class="country">the Philippines</b>
  • I went to my first local Mozilla event in 2011 and was inspired to do more by all the amazing people I met and got to know. And now, I am the Mozilla Philippines Community Manager.
  • Firefox Student Ambassadors
  • Community Building
  • My passion is for organizing local Webmaker and WoMoz (Women in Mozilla) community events where I can train others and help them develop their skills. I also help out with the Firefox Student Ambassadors program and Community Building.
  • Hi, I’m <b class="name">Shreyas</b>, a Mozillian in <b class="country">India</b>
  • I’m a Webmaker Super Mentor who’s passionate about building a more open Web. I love any chance to bring my community together — whether it’s through MozCafes, teaching opportunities or just getting together to talk about projects.
  • Maker Party
  • One thing I’m most proud of in my time as a Mozillian is “KidZilla,” a project that I initiated to educate underprivileged students about the basics of computers and the Internet.
  • I’m also an avid writer — if you work in Communications or PR, feel free to get in touch with me. I would love to work on something. And if you ever want to talk about Webmaking and teaching, I’m always available.
  • Hi, I’m <b class="name">Michael</b>, a Mozillian in <b class="country">Switzerland</b>
  • I started contributing Firefox patches as a teenager in 2008. Four years later, I decided to officially become a Mozilla Rep and have been helping to build the Mozilla Switzerland community ever since.
  • Hack-a-thons
  • In addition to organizing community events in Switzerland, I also coordinate events in Germany and Austria, making me one of only a few Mozillians to help pull off events in three different countries — all within a couple of months of each other.

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privacy/faq.lang

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  • It can be tricky for people to know what to expect of any software or services they use today. The technology that powers our lives is complex and people don’t have the time to dig into the details. That is still true for Firefox, where we find that people have many different ideas of what is happening under the hood in their browser.
  • At Mozilla, we respect and protect your personal information:
  • We only collect the data we need to make the best products.
  • We put people in control of their data and online experiences.
  • We adhere to “no surprises” principle, meaning we work hard to ensure people’s understanding of Firefox matches reality.
  • The following questions and answers should help you understand what to expect from Mozilla and Firefox:
  • I use Firefox for almost everything on the Web. You folks at Mozilla must know a ton of stuff about me, right?
  • Really, you don’t collect my browsing history?
  • Mozilla doesn’t know as much as you’d expect about how people browse the web. As a browser maker, that’s actually a big challenge for us. That is why we’ve built opt-in tools, such as <a href="%(link)s">Firefox Pioneer</a>, which allows interested users to give us insight into their web browsing. If you sync your browsing history across Firefox installations, we don’t know what that history is - because it’s encrypted by your device.
  • Mozilla doesn’t sell data about you, and we don’t buy data about you.
  • Wait, so how do you make money?
  • Mozilla is not your average organization. Founded as a community open source project in 1998, Mozilla is a mission-driven organization working towards a more healthy internet. The majority of Mozilla Corporation’s revenue is from royalties earned through Firefox web browser search partnerships and distribution deals around the world. You can learn more about how we make money in our <a href="%(link)s">annual financial report</a>.
  • Okay, those first few were softballs. What data do you collect?
  • We make our documentation public so that anyone can verify what we say is true, tell us if we need to improve, and have confidence that we aren’t hiding anything.
  • That documentation is gobbledygook to me! Can you give it to me in plain English?
  • There are two categories of data that we collect by default in our release version of Firefox.
  • The first is what we call "technical data." This is data about the browser itself, such as the operating system it is running on and information about errors or crashes.
  • The second is what we call "interaction data." This is data about an individual's engagement with Firefox, such as the number of tabs that were open, the status of user preferences, or number of times certain browser features were used, such as screenshots or containers. For example, we collect this data in terms of the back button, that arrow in the upper left corner of your browser that lets you navigate back to a previous webpage in a way that shows us someone used the back button, but doesn’t tell what specific webpages are accessed.
  • Do you collect more data in pre-release versions of Firefox?
  • Sort-of. In addition to the data described above, we receive crash and error reports by default in pre-release version of Firefox.
  • We may also collect additional data in pre-release for one of our <a href="%(link)s">studies</a>. For example, some studies require what we call “web activity data” data, which may include URLs and other information about certain websites. This helps us answer specific questions to improve Firefox, for example, how to better integrate popular websites in specific locales.
  • Mozilla’s pre-release versions of Firefox are development platforms, frequently updated with experimental features. We collect more data in pre-release than what we do after release in order to understand how these experimental features are working. You can opt out of having this data collected in preferences.
  • But why do you collect any data at all?
  • If we don’t know how the browser is performing or which features people use, we can’t make it better and deliver the great product you want. We’ve invested in building data collection and analysis tools that allow us to make smart decisions about our product while respecting people's privacy.
  • Data collection still bugs me. Can I turn it off?
  • What about my account data?
  • We are big believers of data minimization and not asking for things we don't need.
  • You don't need an account to use Firefox. <a href="%(accounts)s">Accounts</a> are required to sync data across devices, but we only ask you for an email address. We don't want to know things like your name, address, birthday and phone number.
  • You don't need an account to use Firefox. Accounts are required to sync data across devices, but we only ask you for an email address. We don't want to know things like your name, address, birthday and phone number.
  • You use digital advertising as part of your marketing mix. Do you buy people's data to better target your online ads?
  • No, we do not buy people's data to target advertising.
  • We do ask our advertising partners to use only first party data that websites and publishers know about all users, such as the browser you are using and the device you are on.
  • Well, it seems like you really have my back on this privacy stuff.
  • Yes, we do.
  • Find out more about how Mozilla protects the internet.

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privacy/index.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • <a href="%(dsar)s">See here for Data Subject Access Requests.</a>
  • For product support requests, please <a href="%(sumo)s">visit our forums</a>.
  • Mozilla's <a href="%(principles)s">Data Privacy Principles</a> inspire our practices that respect and protect people who use the Internet. Learn how these principles shape Firefox and all of our products in this <a href="%(faq)s">FAQ</a>.
  • Mozilla's Data Privacy Principles inspire our practices that respect and protect people who use the Internet. Learn how these principles shape Firefox and all of our products in this <a href="%(faq)s">FAQ</a>.
  • Mozilla is an open source project with a mission to improve your Internet experience. This is a driving force behind our data privacy practices. <a href="%(link)s">Read More</a>
  • As an open source project, transparency and openness are an essential part of Mozilla’s founding principles. Our codebases are open and auditable. Our development work is open. Our bi-annual <a href="%(report)s">Transparency Report</a> also demonstrates our commitment to these principles.
  • To review and comment on proposed changes to our privacy policies, <a href="%(group)s"> subscribe to Mozilla’s governance group</a>.
  • To review and comment on proposed changes to our privacy policies <a href="%(group)s"> subscribe to Mozilla’s Governance Group</a>.
  • Read more about our ongoing privacy and security public policy work on <a href="%(blog)s">Mozilla's Open Policy and Advocacy Blog</a>.
  • Our ongoing work on privacy is covered by the <a href="%(blog)s">Privacy &amp; Data Safety Blog</a> and information about our ongoing work is available on <a href="%(wiki)s"> Mozilla’s privacy team wiki</a>.

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;Plugins
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