Web Dashboard

Lang format file checker nn-NO

www.mozilla.orglang

Repository: https://github.com/mozilla-l10n/www.mozilla.org/tree/master/nn-NO/

DONE

download_button.lang firefox/accounts-2018.lang firefox/accounts.lang firefox/all.lang firefox/campaign.lang firefox/channel/index.lang firefox/facebookcontainer/index.lang firefox/features/bookmarks.lang firefox/features/fast.lang firefox/features/independent.lang firefox/features/index.lang firefox/features/memory.lang firefox/features/password-manager.lang firefox/features/private-browsing.lang firefox/features/send-tabs.lang firefox/features/sync.lang firefox/hub/home-quantum.lang firefox/installer-help.lang firefox/mobile.lang firefox/nightly_firstrun.lang firefox/nightly_whatsnew.lang firefox/products/developer-quantum.lang firefox/profile-per-install.lang firefox/sendto.lang firefox/shared.lang firefox/switch.lang firefox/whatsnew.lang firefox/whatsnew_61.lang firefox/whatsnew_63.lang firefox/whatsnew_66.lang firefox/whatsnew_67.lang main.lang mozorg/404.lang mozorg/500.lang mozorg/about.lang mozorg/about/history-details.lang mozorg/about/history.lang mozorg/about/manifesto.lang mozorg/contribute/index.lang mozorg/contribute/signup.lang mozorg/contribute/stories.lang mozorg/home/index-quantum.lang mozorg/internet-health/index.lang mozorg/internet-health/shared.lang mozorg/mission.lang mozorg/plugincheck-update.lang mozorg/products.lang mozorg/technology.lang navigation.lang newsletter.lang privacy/principles.lang

TODO

firefox/new/quantum.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • Download Mozilla Firefox for Mac, a free Web browser. Firefox is created by a global non-profit dedicated to putting individuals in control online. Get Firefox for Mac today!
  • Download Mozilla Firefox for Linux, a free Web browser. Firefox is created by a global non-profit dedicated to putting individuals in control online. Get Firefox for Linux today!
  • Faster page loading, less memory usage and packed with features, the new Firefox for Windows is here.
  • Faster page loading, less memory usage and packed with features, the new Firefox for Mac is here.
  • Faster page loading, less memory usage and packed with features, the new Firefox for Linux is here.
  • Firefox moves fast and treats your data with care - no ad tracking and no slowdown.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/new/trailhead.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • Download Mozilla Firefox, a free Web browser. Firefox is created by a global non-profit dedicated to putting individuals in control online. Get Firefox for Windows, macOS, Linux, Android and iOS today!
  • Download the fastest Firefox ever
  • Faster page loading, less memory usage and packed with features, the new Firefox is here.
  • Get the latest Firefox browser.
  • And start getting the respect you deserve with our family of privacy-first products.
  • Advanced install options & other platforms
  • Fix a problem
  • Join Firefox
  • Connect to a whole family of respectful products, plus all the knowledge you need to protect yourself online.
  • Passwords made portable
  • <strong>Firefox Lockwise</strong> makes the passwords you save in Firefox available on all your devices.
  • Protect your privacy
  • <strong>Private Browsing</strong> clears your history to keep it secret from anyone who uses your computer.
  • Advanced Install Options & Other Platforms
  • Download on the App Store
  • You’re using an insecure, outdated operating system <a href="%(url)s">no longer supported by Firefox</a>.
  • Your download should begin automatically. Didn’t work? <a id="%(id)s" href="%(fallback_url)s">Try downloading again</a>.
  • It’s <strong>privacy and peace of mind</strong> on mobile, too.
  • It’s a <strong>family of products</strong> that treat your personal data with respect.
  • It’s everything you need to know about <strong>staying safe online</strong>.
  • It’s <strong>a community</strong> that believes tech can do better.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

firefox/tracking-protection-tour.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • If content blocking prevents you from using a site you trust, select “Turn off Blocking Temporarily.”
  • If content blocking prevents you from using a site you trust, you can select “Disable Blocking Temporarily” in this panel.
  • If content blocking prevents you from using a site you trust, select “Turn off Blocking for This Site.”
  • If content blocking prevents you from using a site you trust, you can select “Disable Blocking For This Site” in this panel.
  • It’s easy to turn off Tracking Protection for the website you’re on. Just select “Disable Blocking Temporarily.”
  • It’s easy to turn off Tracking Protection for the website you’re on. Just select “Disable Blocking For This Site.”
  • It’s easy to turn on Tracking Protection for the website you’re on by clicking “Enable Blocking For This Site.”
  • To restore content blocking for a site, select “Turn on Blocking for This Site.“
  • To restore content blocking for a site, select “Enable Blocking For This Site“ in the Control Center panel.
  • Content blocking can keep parts of pages or entire pages from loading.
  • Content blocking can help pages load faster, but it can also keep parts of pages or entire pages from loading.
  • The privacy benefits of Tracking Protection are now just one part of content blocking. When you see the shield, content blocking is on.
  • If content blocking prevents you from using a site you trust, you can select “Disable Blocking Temporarily“ in this panel.
  • If content blocking prevents you from using a site you trust, you can select “Disable Blocking For This Site“ in this panel.
  • Firefox is non-profit, non-corporate, non-compromised. Choosing Firefox isn’t just choosing a browser. It’s a vote for personal freedom.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/about-2019.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • Mozilla makes browsers, apps, code and tools that put people before profit. Our mission: Keep the internet open and accessible to all.
  • Mozilla makes browsers, apps, code and tools that put people before profit.
  • Our mission: Keep the internet open and accessible to all.
  • Our Mission in Action
  • Pioneers of The Open Web
  • Our leadership has been at the forefront of building a healthier internet since Day 1. What began as an alternative to corporate domination has grown into a global force for good online.
  • Firefox: Fast for Good
  • When you use the new Firefox, you get a blazing fast experience while supporting Mozilla’s mission to keep the internet healthy, weird and welcoming to all.
  • Walking Our Privacy Talk
  • When the Facebook breach was revealed, Mozilla had an immediate response – and a Firefox product to support user privacy.
  • Talking Internet Issues IRL
  • In Mozilla’s IRL podcast, host Manoush Zomorodi shares real stories of life online and real talk about the future of the Web.
  • Corporation. Foundation. Not-for-profit.
  • Learn about the Mozilla Foundation
  • Mozilla puts people over profit in everything we say, build and do. In fact, there’s a non-profit Foundation at the heart of our enterprise.
  • The Mozilla Manifesto
  • The principles we wrote in 1998 still guide us today. And in 2018, we created an addendum to emphasize inclusion, privacy and safety for everyone online.
  • A Global View
  • With <a href="%(url)s">offices all over the world</a>, we consider the internet from multiple cultures and contexts.
  • <strong>2000</strong> non-employee guests welcomed each year
  • <strong>500</strong> annual attendees to the Berlin speaker series
  • <strong>400</strong> collaborative visits with Mozilla employees each year.
  • <strong>800</strong> bottles of cold brew coffee consumed yearly.
  • Work at Mozilla
  • Join a mission-driven organization that builds purpose-driven products.
  • Mozilla Careers
  • How You Can Help
  • Your voice. Your code. Your support. There are so many ways to join the fight for a healthy internet.
  • Get The Mozilla Newsletter
  • Stay informed about the issues affecting the internet, and learn how you can get involved in protecting the world’s newest public resource.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/internet-health/decentralization.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • The Internet owes much of its success to openness: its open, shared structure has made it easy for everyone to build, surf, and thrive on it. But a few big companies are closing in, closing doors, and creating walled gardens that concentrate their ownership and control of the Web. Together, we can fight to make sure no one limits our Internet access, experience, or creation.
  • We rely on network providers – telcos and cable companies – for access to the Internet. Which puts them in a position to restrict that access for their own business objectives, favoring their own products, blocking sites or brands, or charging different prices and offering different speeds depending on content type. Net neutrality prohibits network providers from discriminating based on content, so everyone has equal access.
  • The fight for net neutrality continues all over the world. The rules that have been adopted in the US and Europe need to be defended and enforced. Reach out to your government official wherever you live, and express your support.
  • Working directly with legislative bodies to craft policy frameworks for and meaningful enforcement of net neutrality in the <a href="%(usa)s">United States</a>, <a href="%(europe)s">Europe</a>, <a href="%(india)s">India</a>, and all over the world.
  • The Web should remain open and interoperable, so we can keep our experience consistent, transparent, and full of possibility.
  • Interoperability is a big word with a simple result: your Web experience is basically the same across browsers, hardware, and operating systems because it was designed that way – and built with the open standards to support it. Open standards also allow anyone to invent new ways to make your Web experience better. But interoperability is losing ground to closed systems – and we’re losing transparency, participation, and innovation along with it.
  • Nearly half the economic potential of the Internet of Things relies on its systems being interoperable.
  • 73% of Internet users have seen someone harassed online and 40% have personally experienced it.
  • Innovation can still come from anywhere – especially if we support it. Try out apps and products from companies you don’t already know.
  • Working with and even leading open standards bodies, like <a href="%(ietf)s">IETF</a> and <a href="%(w3c)s">W3C</a>.
  • Walking the talk
  • The Internet should continue to foster healthy competition among companies, opportunity for entrepreneurs, and meaningful choices for users.
  • A personalized Internet is an exciting prospect. But more and more, that means opting into a single company’s ecosystem – which streamlines your experience right now, but may seriously limit your choices in the future. Competitors will be reduced to those few companies who can offer the whole enchilada, thus consolidating the power of existing tech giants and making it much harder for entrepreneurs to disrupt the market with great ideas.
  • In most EU member countries, Google controls more than 90 percent of the search market. In some countries, it controls as much as 97%.
  • Make sure you understand the tradeoffs of that seamless online experience before you opt into a single ecosystem. Support the companies and services that best reflect your needs – and your values.
  • Opposing gatekeeper power
  • We should all be able to contribute to the Web, so it reflects and serves all of its users.
  • Today 3 billion people all over the world use the Internet to learn, work, play, and connect. But not everyone is able to contribute to it equally. Which means the Web doesn’t reflect the full diversity of its users, doesn’t work as well for some people as others, and can even marginalize certain communities and individuals.
  • Chinese, Spanish, Arabic and Portuguese speaking internet users make up 37.5% of the total online population, but only 11% of the Web is in their language.
  • Try your hand at creating Web content you care about, in your language. <a href="%(thimble)s">Thimble</a> is a great way to start.
  • Providing the <a href="%(tools)s">tools</a> and <a href="%(teaching)s">teaching</a> to foster the next generation of Web creators.
  • Providing the <a href="%(l10n)s">blueprint for localization</a>, so Web content can be made relevant for people in different languages and locales.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/internet-health/digital-inclusion.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • The more voices, perspective, languages, and people contributing to the Web, the richer the experience for everyone. But the whole Internet is not yet accessible, welcoming, and safe for all. Together, we have the power to shape the Web, and our world along with it.
  • For the Internet to fulfill its greatest promise, it must reflect the diversity and experience of all people, everywhere.
  • As inclusive as the Web can seem, it’s not yet an equal playing field. More than half the world is still without it; emerging economies and marginalized communities are often the last to gain access. Far fewer women are using the Internet than men. And without diversity among its creators, the Web itself will reflect unconscious biases, while personalizing algorithms can reinforce our own.
  • In nine developing countries, women are still nearly 50% less likely to access the Internet than men.
  • Support a resource like <a href="%(wiki_support)s">Wikipedia</a> that drastically lowers the barriers to knowledge – or better yet, <a href="%(wiki_contribute)s">help build it</a>. Wikipedia needs more, and more diverse, contributors.
  • Advancing web accessibility standards, and making Firefox inclusive through efforts like our <a href="%(web_a11y)s">Accessibility</a> team.
  • <a href="%(un_women)s">Partnering with UN Women</a> to help women in Africa and across the globe build key digital skills.
  • We should all have the ability to participate fully on the Internet, without threat to our reputations, our confidence, or our safety.
  • We’ve all seen our share of nasty comments sections. At times, the Web can feel like a very unfriendly place – particularly for women, minorities, and members of marginalized communities. By discouraging people from getting online, cyberbullying and cyber violence threaten not just individuals, but the Internet itself.
  • 73% of Internet users have seen someone harassed online and 40% have personally experienced it.
  • If you see cyber violence and bullying online, <a href="%(report)s">record it and report it</a>.
  • Creating open curricula that empowers people to create safe spaces online, like the <a href="%(teaching)s">Teaching Kit: Combating Cyber Violence Against Women and Girls</a>.
  • We should all have affordable, high-quality, unrestricted access to the whole Web, so the whole world can benefit.
  • To participate online, you have to be able to get online. Programs have emerged that offer free or subsidized Internet access, but it is often slow or restricted, creating a ‘poor Internet for poor people.’ At its most extreme, governments worldwide are turning off all or parts of the Internet to serve their own agendas, which can threaten human rights and even the health of the global economy.
  • In 2016, there were 51 intentional Internet shutdowns in 18 countries.
  • Donate your old computers, laptops, and phones to non-profits that refurbish and redistribute them to underserved communities.
  • Donate your old computers, laptops, and phones to non-profits like <a href="%(reconnect)s">Reconnect</a>, <a href="%(strut)s">Students Recycling Used Technology</a>, or <a href="%(interconnection)s">Interconnection</a>, who refurbish and redistribute them to underserved communities.
  • Tell your representatives that open and affordable access to the Internet should be a policy priority.
  • Sponsoring the <a href="%(equalrating)s">Equal Rating Innovation Challenge</a> to find novel solutions for connecting the unconnected to the full, open Internet.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/internet-health/open-innovation.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • The Internet was built on the promise that any one of us might create the next big thing. But in order to keep creating, imagining, and reinventing our future online, the building blocks of the Web must be open to all. And together, we need to make sure the policies and laws that govern those building blocks are fair and functional.
  • Open source software – technology built with code that is open for view, use, and modification – is the engine that powers a huge amount of the Internet, from servers to operating systems to the bots that fetch your search results. It’s the infrastructure that makes the Web a truly public resource: transparent, trustworthy, and collaborative, so that anyone with an idea can contribute. But much like our IRL infrastructure, we have to commit the attention and resources to maintain it.
  • Patents were designed to create incentive for innovation. But the patent system and software development don’t always get along so well. Software patents are often written so broadly that they’re open to misinterpretation, and exclusive rights can far outlive the shelf life of the software itself. All of which creates obstacles and uncertainty for innovators, and leaves the door open for patent trolls and endless litigation.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/internet-health/privacy-security.lang

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Strings identical to English:

  • The Internet only stays healthy if we trust it as a safe place – to explore, transact, connect, and create. Our privacy and security online is under constant threat. But there’s something you can do about it: get informed, protect yourself, and make your voice heard.
  • We should all be able to choose – with clarity and confidence – what information we share with what companies, understanding the tradeoffs we’re making when we do.
  • Right now, we all lack meaningful choice online – privacy policies are often miles long and hard to read, we don’t understand what information we’re sharing or when, and opting out is seldom on the menu.
  • 91% of adults agree that consumers have lost control of how personal information is collected and used by companies.
  • Make sure your mobile apps access only the info they need. Control your privacy and location settings on <a href="%(ios)s" rel="external">iOS</a> and <a href="%(android)s" rel="external">Android</a>.
  • Know your settings. You can manage your profile and preferences for <a href="%(google)s">Google</a>, <a href="%(yahoo)s">Yahoo!</a> and <a href="%(facebook)s">Facebook</a> ads.
  • Know your settings. You can manage your profile and preferences for <a href="%(google)s">Google</a>, <a href="%(yahoo)s">Yahoo!</a> and <a href="%(facebook)s">Facebook</a> ads, and even <a href="%(acxiom)s">edit data that’s been collected about you by Acxiom</a>, one of the world’s largest marketing data brokers.
  • Writing <a href="%(privacy)s">our own privacy policy</a> in clear, understandable language.
  • Walking the talk with our own products, with features like the Forget Button, and <a href="%(focus)s">Firefox Focus</a>, our private browser for iOS.
  • Encouraging and educating the industry about <a href="%(leandata)s">lean data practices</a>.
  • We should all have the ability to protect our online identity.
  • At this point, it feels like we’ve all been victims of a cyberattack somewhere, somehow. Data breaches can lay bare the passwords of millions of people, often going undiscovered for years. Which means your identity may be at risk of theft without you even knowing it.
  • Breaches affected hundreds of millions of accounts in 2013-2016. In December 2016, the biggest breach in history was reported: 1 billion accounts.
  • Source: Wikipedia, <a href="%(wiki)s" rel="external">List of data breaches</a>, 2013-2016
  • <a href="%(strongpass)s" rel="external">Choose strong, unique pins and passwords</a>, and use a <a href="%(passmanager)s" rel="external">password manager</a>. (Note: we haven’t tried them all – see what works for you.)
  • An extra step goes a long way. For the best protection, take advantage of <a href="%(twofactor)s" rel="external">2-factor authentication</a> wherever it’s offered.
  • Educating the industry about <a href="%(leandata)s">lean data practices</a>.
  • Government Surveillance: Keeping prying eyes and ears out of your business
  • We should all have the freedom to be ourselves — online and off – without surveillance, judgment and imposed societal bias.
  • You wouldn’t want the government following your every move in real life – there’s no reason they should be shadowing you on the Internet. The Edward Snowden disclosures showed that even democracies can and do take liberties with your privacy.
  • Just four in 10 (38%) of internet users trust that their activities on the internet are not being monitored.
  • Recommending <a href="%(reform)s" rel="external">reform at the policy level</a> to improve government disclosure of security vulnerabilities.
  • Calling on lawmakers
  • Calling on lawmakers all over the globe to rein in mass surveillance, and <a href="%(usafreedom)s" rel="external">helping to pass the USA Freedom Act</a>.
  • Cohosting <a href="%(standford)s" rel="external">talks with Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society</a> about government hacking.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

mozorg/internet-health/web-literacy.lang

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Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • People everywhere should have the knowledge they need to tap into the full power of the Internet – and use it to make their lives and the world better. This means everyone needs to be able to read, write, and participate online.
  • Web literacy should mean all the skills we need to think, create, and thrive online.
  • Many people hear the term Web literacy and think it means learning to code, or <abbr>STEM</abbr> (science, technology, engineering, math) education. But Web literacy is much broader than that – it should include all the skills to be confident and competent online. To be empowered digital citizens, we all need to know how to navigate, how to share, what information to trust, and most importantly, how to expand the frontiers of our knowledge.
  • Collaborating with leaders in the field to create Mozilla’s <a href="%(map)s">Web Literacy Map</a> that provides a clear, practical definition of web literacy.
  • Working with educations and policymakers to help make Web literacy <a href="%(education)s">as foundational to education as reading and math</a>.
  • Web literacy should be as foundational to education as reading, writing, and math – and it should be taught everywhere learning happens.
  • Learning Web literacy is like any other essential skill: we learn best by doing. And in the digital world, learning happens not just with teachers in the classroom, but everywhere there’s an Internet connection. We need all kinds of educators to have the knowledge and resources to teach Web literacy the way kids learn it best. And we need to make sure every student grows up not just on the Web, but fluent in the way it works.
  • Increasing the number of young adults with Internet skills is a United Nations Sustainable Development Goal, and the UN now tracks schools with computers and Internet.
  • Giving educators of all kinds the <a href="%(activities)s">skills and tools</a> they need to teach Web literacy, including knowledge-sharing efforts like <a href="%(hive)s">Hive Learning Networks</a>.
  • Creating opportunities and building communities to support youth accessing the Web and <a href="%(learning)s">learning how to use it</a>, like our <a href="%(un_women)s">partnership with UN Women</a> to teach digital skills to girls and women in Africa.
  • A fundamental part of Web literacy is understanding the forces that shape our lives online: the companies building our experiences, the politicians crafting and supporting government policies, and the power we hold as digital citizens to create the Internet we want. Having a say in our shared future on the Web means deciding which values are most important to us, and standing up for those values when they are threatened.
  • Indian Citizens sent over 750,000 emails to the Telecom Authority of India in just one week, ultimately influencing their government’s decision to ban discriminatory pricing practices.
  • Which aspect of your online life matters most to you? <a href="%(privacy)s">Privacy</a>? Net neutrality? <a href="%(inclusion)s">Inclusion</a>? Learn about the issues, and find your own way to take action.
  • Creating space for understanding, conversation, and community around what makes a healthy Internet – like the page you’re reading right now, and campaigns such as <a href="%(reform_copyright)s">Reform Copyright</a>.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

privacy/faq.lang

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35 8 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • It can be tricky for people to know what to expect of any software or services they use today. The technology that powers our lives is complex and people don’t have the time to dig into the details. That is still true for Firefox, where we find that people have many different ideas of what is happening under the hood in their browser.
  • We follow a set of <a href="%(link)s">Data Privacy Principles</a> that shape our approach to privacy in the Firefox desktop and mobile browsers.
  • We only collect the data we need to make the best products.
  • We put people in control of their data and online experiences.
  • We adhere to “no surprises” principle, meaning we work hard to ensure people’s understanding of Firefox matches reality.
  • The following questions and answers should help you understand what to expect from Mozilla and Firefox:
  • I use Firefox for almost everything on the Web. You folks at Mozilla must know a ton of stuff about me, right?
  • Firefox, the web browser that runs on your device or computer, is your gateway to the internet. Your browser will manage a lot of information about the websites you visit, but that information stays on your device. Mozilla, the company that makes Firefox, doesn’t collect it (unless you ask us to).
  • Really, you don’t collect my browsing history?
  • Mozilla doesn’t know as much as you’d expect about how people browse the web. As a browser maker, that’s actually a big challenge for us. That is why we’ve built opt-in tools, such as <a href="%(link)s">Firefox Pioneer</a>, which allows interested users to give us insight into their web browsing. If you sync your browsing history across Firefox installations, we don’t know what that history is - because it’s encrypted by your device.
  • It seems like every company on the web is buying and selling my data. You’re probably no different.
  • Mozilla doesn’t sell data about you, and we don’t buy data about you.
  • Mozilla is not your average organization. Founded as a community open source project in 1998, Mozilla is a mission-driven organization working towards a more healthy internet. The majority of Mozilla Corporation’s revenue is from royalties earned through Firefox web browser search partnerships and distribution deals around the world. You can learn more about how we make money in our <a href="%(link)s">annual financial report</a>.
  • Okay, those first few were softballs. What data do you collect?
  • Mozilla does collect a limited set of data by default from Firefox that helps us to understand how people use the browser. That data is tied to a random identifier, rather than your name or email address. You can read more about that on our <a href="%(privacy)s">privacy notice</a> and you can read the <a href="%(data)s">full documentation for that data collection</a>.
  • We make our documentation public so that anyone can verify what we say is true, tell us if we need to improve, and have confidence that we aren’t hiding anything.
  • That documentation is gobbledygook to me! Can you give it to me in plain English?
  • There are two categories of data that we collect by default in our release version of Firefox.
  • The first is what we call "technical data." This is data about the browser itself, such as the operating system it is running on and information about errors or crashes.
  • The second is what we call "interaction data." This is data about an individual's engagement with Firefox, such as the number of tabs that were open, the status of user preferences, or number of times certain browser features were used, such as screenshots or containers. For example, we collect this data in terms of the back button, that arrow in the upper left corner of your browser that lets you navigate back to a previous webpage in a way that shows us someone used the back button, but doesn’t tell what specific webpages are accessed.
  • Do you collect more data in pre-release versions of Firefox?
  • Sort-of. In addition to the data described above, we receive crash and error reports by default in pre-release version of Firefox.
  • We may also collect additional data in pre-release for one of our <a href="%(link)s">studies</a>. For example, some studies require what we call “web activity data” data, which may include URLs and other information about certain websites. This helps us answer specific questions to improve Firefox, for example, how to better integrate popular websites in specific locales.
  • Mozilla’s pre-release versions of Firefox are development platforms, frequently updated with experimental features. We collect more data in pre-release than what we do after release in order to understand how these experimental features are working. You can opt out of having this data collected in preferences.
  • But why do you collect any data at all?
  • If we don’t know how the browser is performing or which features people use, we can’t make it better and deliver the great product you want. We’ve invested in building data collection and analysis tools that allow us to make smart decisions about our product while respecting people's privacy.
  • Data collection still bugs me. Can I turn it off?
  • Yes. User control is one of our data privacy principles. We put that into practice in Firefox on our <a href="%(settings)s">privacy settings page</a>, which serves as a one-stop shop for anyone looking to take control of their privacy in Firefox. You can <a href="%(data)s">turn off data collection</a> there.
  • We are big believers of data minimization and not asking for things we don't need.
  • You don't need an account to use Firefox. <a href="%(accounts)s">Accounts</a> are required to sync data across devices, but we only ask you for an email address. We don't want to know things like your name, address, birthday and phone number.
  • You don't need an account to use Firefox. Accounts are required to sync data across devices, but we only ask you for an email address. We don't want to know things like your name, address, birthday and phone number.
  • You use digital advertising as part of your marketing mix. Do you buy people's data to better target your online ads?
  • No, we do not buy people's data to target advertising.
  • We do ask our advertising partners to use only first party data that websites and publishers know about all users, such as the browser you are using and the device you are on.
  • Well, it seems like you really have my back on this privacy stuff.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}

privacy/index.lang

Identical Trans. Missing Errors
10 15 0 0
Original English source file
Your translated file
Attach your updated file to Bugzilla

Strings identical to English:

  • <a href="%(dsar)s">See here for Data Subject Access Requests.</a>
  • Mozilla's Data Privacy Principles inspire our practices that respect and protect people who use the Internet. Learn how these principles shape Firefox and all of our products in this <a href="%(faq)s">FAQ</a>.
  • Mozilla is an open source project with a mission to improve your Internet experience. This is a driving force behind our data privacy practices. <a href="%(link)s">Read More</a>
  • Our Privacy Notices describe the data our products and services receive, share, and use, as well as choices available to you.
  • We created short and clear Privacy Notices to describe how each of our products and services receives, shares, and uses data and what your choices are. Learn more:
  • As an open source project, transparency and openness are an essential part of Mozilla’s founding principles. Our codebases are open and auditable. Our development work is open. Our bi-annual <a href="%(report)s">Transparency Report</a> also demonstrates our commitment to these principles.
  • To review and comment on proposed changes to our privacy policies, <a href="%(group)s"> subscribe to Mozilla’s governance group</a>.
  • To review and comment on proposed changes to our privacy policies <a href="%(group)s"> subscribe to Mozilla’s Governance Group</a>.
  • Read more about our ongoing privacy and security public policy work on <a href="%(blog)s">Mozilla's Open Policy and Advocacy Blog</a>.
  • Our ongoing work on privacy is covered by the <a href="%(blog)s">Privacy &amp; Data Safety Blog</a> and information about our ongoing work is available on <a href="%(wiki)s"> Mozilla’s privacy team wiki</a>.

Tip: if it is expected that a string is identical to the English one for your language, just add {ok} to your string and it will no longer be listed as "identical". Example:

;Plugins
Plugins {ok}